neu-cda


Zeming Bao <bao.ze>

Dear professor,

Hope all is well. My five reading responses are attached in order. Home Page: https://hackmd.io/v9uZPqIBQaGMwP81dbgIQA [https://hackmd.io/images/media/HackMD-og.jpg]https://hackmd.io/v9uZPqIBQaGMwP81dbgIQA Zeming Bao's Home Page - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/v9uZPqIBQaGMwP81dbgIQA hackmd.io

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Sincerely, Zeming Bao


Hillary Diaz Castillo <diazcastillo.h>

I apologize; here is the link to my response: https://hackmd.io/@drahills/rJSv8MRli [https://www.gravatar.com/avatar/5330fb22309850af278ea347cdc08816?s=400]https://hackmd.io/@drahills/rJSv8MRli Reading Responses (Set 2) - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/@drahills/rJSv8MRli

Reading Responses (Set 2) ## The Modern Business of Love [image alt](https://i.pinimg.com/564x

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From: Hillary Diaz Castillo Sent: Tuesday, December 6, 2022 1:49 AM To: Reagle, Joseph Subject: Hackmd

## Pushback

image alt

As I reflect on the incident, I can better understand the feedback I received and agree with most of my critics’ points. I was insensitive, rude, and overly critical. However, I don’t believe that I deserved the level of backlash that I received, which went from people calling me names to members straight up telling me to leave the group. Joseph Reagle (2019) explains that “even skillful feedback sometimes prompts angry responses.” In my case, only a few comments tried to engage in a constructive discussion with me, while a great majority –mostly writers- utilized me as a scapegoat to express their hatred for “mean” reviewers. This is not unusual in places like Goodreads, where individual reviews are “hypotextual, and unsolicited comment can easily find its way to the subject-and to everyone else” (Reagle 2019). Personal opinions become the subject of heavy discussions, as individuals, in my opinion, fail to contextualize other users as actual people.

While my experience was not as traumatic as what individuals like Kathy Sierra experienced (harassment, death threats), it still managed to encapsulate a general concern about hostile communication on the internet. Even though this tends to publicly humiliate individuals in the name of morals is not unique to online communities, the internet has helped normalize this behavior, particularly with the rise of canceling culture on platforms like Twitter. People feel deeply entitled to their opinions, and the Internet allows users to express themselves in ways that would not be otherwise accepted in daily life. As a result, many users have become disillusioned with communication technology.

People are increasingly deciding to react against the “overload of information and changing relationships” by “pushing back against permanent connectivity, in an attempt to manage, limit or control their exposure” to different variations of social technologies (Gomez & Morrison 2014). The pushback movement either takes the form of managing technology to reduce satisfaction, collective decisions to limit media use, technology intervention to reduce media use, or dropping technology completely (Gomez & Morrison 2014). I am particularly fascinated by the latter option, which I find to be almost ludicrous at a time when people are so interconnected with social media. For instance, people use platforms such as LinkedIn to apply for jobs and connect with future employers. We live many of our lives online, even if it’s not by choice.


Hillary Diaz Castillo <diazcastillo.h>

Pushback

image alt

As I reflect on the incident, I can better understand the feedback I received and agree with most of my critics’ points. I was insensitive, rude, and overly critical. However, I don’t believe that I deserved the level of backlash that I received, which went from people calling me names to members straight up telling me to leave the group. Joseph Reagle (2019) explains that “even skillful feedback sometimes prompts angry responses.” In my case, only a few comments tried to engage in a constructive discussion with me, while a great majority –mostly writers- utilized me as a scapegoat to express their hatred for “mean” reviewers. This is not unusual in places like Goodreads, where individual reviews are “hypotextual, and unsolicited comment can easily find its way to the subject-and to everyone else” (Reagle 2019). Personal opinions become the subject of heavy discussions, as individuals, in my opinion, fail to contextualize other users as actual people.

While my experience was not as traumatic as what individuals like Kathy Sierra experienced (harassment, death threats), it still managed to encapsulate a general concern about hostile communication on the internet. Even though this tends to publicly humiliate individuals in the name of morals is not unique to online communities, the internet has helped normalize this behavior, particularly with the rise of canceling culture on platforms like Twitter. People feel deeply entitled to their opinions, and the Internet allows users to express themselves in ways that would not be otherwise accepted in daily life. As a result, many users have become disillusioned with communication technology.

People are increasingly deciding to react against the “overload of information and changing relationships” by “pushing back against permanent connectivity, in an attempt to manage, limit or control their exposure” to different variations of social technologies (Gomez & Morrison 2014). The pushback movement either takes the form of managing technology to reduce satisfaction, collective decisions to limit media use, technology intervention to reduce media use, or dropping technology completely (Gomez & Morrison 2014). I am particularly fascinated by the latter option, which I find to be almost ludicrous at a time when people are so interconnected with social media. For instance, people use platforms such as LinkedIn to apply for jobs and connect with future employers. We live many of our lives online, even if it’s not by choice.


Chloe Colipano <colipano.c>

home page: https://hackmd.io/@lkRsNF0ETnulcOnq54p5dw/S1xJMMCxj reading response page: https://hackmd.io/@lkRsNF0ETnulcOnq54p5dw/HyvvUxMrj markdown:

Dec 6 - Pushback

Like a double-edged sword, comments have the ability to inform and improve–while also risking alienation and manipulation. If I were to slay a dragon (let’s say, a book I just read) with my double-edged sword (a GoodReads review), what is the turnout? Will I leave a positive review because I love dragons? Or will I leave a negative review because I think dragons are terrifying? Our state of online communication makes it so that the digital space is a free-for-all, maybe even a Player-Vs.-Player arena. Instead of slaying the dragon, we slay each other. Or sometimes we all slay the dragon together. It’s true: sometimes commenting can unite a community and provide a safe space for opinion-sharing, fostering a climate of positivity. But the opposite is also true: Joseph Reagle’s “Commenterrible” discusses how from bully battles to drama genres, online commenting can be widely inflammatory. The beauty of comment sections is that they are terrible. And I must admit, there is something exciting about watching the flames burn.

Several years ago, a new mobile game seized the market: a legend that goes by the name “Flappy Bird.” And one of its main spaces for online commentary happened to be the app’s review section in the Apple Store. People around the world commented on how Flappy Bird “ruined their life” and how “you can’t escape it,” not because they particularly hated the game, but because the game caused a severe technological addiction. As said by Ricardo Gomez and Stacey Morrison, one of the motivations of pushback is Addiction, or pushing back as a result of technology addiction, and Flappy Bird is a prime example of a widespread pushback against technology addiction. It was as if everyone was in on the “joke,” with talk about how Flappy Bird supposedly “killed their families,” or “brought them to insanity.” But obviously, Flappy Bird did not do this realistically. So, then, who started the chain of “hate” comments? What did the creator of Flappy Bird think of these “hate” comments? Were they taken seriously? Or were they understood as just another Internet meme? Did Flappy Bird’s creator push back against the Pushback? In 2013, it seems there really was no rest for the Devil Bird.

Chloe Colipano (she/they) Northeastern University, Class of 2025 Candidate for B.S. in Business Administration and Communications Concentrations in Marketing and Marketing Analytics


Carolyn Diaz <diaz.car>

https://hackmd.io/@cazmingu/HJEBhtOVi


Kate Dougherty <dougherty.kate>

Home Page: https://hackmd.io/@W_s20hwGRWam1n9qf_jVBA/HyK764peo Reading Response Page https://hackmd.io/@W_s20hwGRWam1n9qf_jVBA/ByYMW9dEi


Clara Duthoit <duthoit.c>

Good afternoon professor,

Here is the link to the page with my 5 responses for set #2: https://hackmd.io/@claraduthoit/HJZZzLE4j Thank you!

Best, Clara Duthoit


Carlos Fuente <fuente.c>

Reading Response Set 2: https://hackmd.io/@carlosafuente/BJz53OE4o


Anidalia Gonzalez Grullon <gonzalez.ani>

Hi professor,

I hope this email finds you well. Attached is my final reading response.

Home Page: https://hackmd.io/@ANIDALIA1809/BJAp-2plo Reading responses: https://hackmd.io/@ANIDALIA1809/ByOGtPCVs [https://www.gravatar.com/avatar/6c9e26fb96d923162040d2946b0d453b?s=400]https://hackmd.io/@ANIDALIA1809/ByOGtPCVs Reading Responses (Set 2) - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/@ANIDALIA1809/ByOGtPCVs

tags: CDA # Reading Responses (Set 2) Nov 01 Tue - Finding someone & living alone - Ho

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Online shoppers call the moment of “anxious ruminations” as “pulling the trigger” considering the deal is done, no matter the hesitations and consequences (Reagle, 2019). Multiple times in the past, I have had better online shopping experiences by simply purchasing products and avoiding the comments, ratings, and suggestions listed below. Therefore, the starting claim is something I agree with, and the other allegations mention how comments can be helpful, even if sometimes comments aren’t fully trustworthy. This is an understandable reason why many prefer to disable and restrict comments on their sites. It is impressive how the chapter mentioned Boing Boing’s comments being problematic until the editor mentioned he was likely to permanently disable comments. Sometimes, people’s online comments can drive prominent editors to that point, especially after noticing that most of the comment section isn’t beneficial and provides the opposite sought feedback.

Moreover, it was exciting to notice the different types of comments and people’s varying opinions. For instance, the case of Lawrence Lessig, who had temporarily abandoned his blog in 2009 and found the display of a different website’s comments more beneficial, caught my attention. For him, comments that appeared as annotations and were more specific to a certain part of a paragraph was something he enjoyed. Also, witnessing how authors benefited from comments, used them differently, and had diverse opinions on the online presence and comments, allowed me to engage more in the reading. It reminded me that no matter what profession people take, we all will have different opinions on things that we firmly believe in and might find it challenging to open up our perspectives to understand other people’s forms of thinking. Finally, seeing how filter bubbles impact comments and what we see displayed on our pages is shocking. This leads to evidence of how these bubbles follow us everywhere we go online, even with how comments are displayed to appeal to people’s personal beliefs and find ways to engage them more.

Best,

Anidalia


Michelle Kim <kim.miche>

Hi Dr. Reagle,

Link: https://hackmd.io/@michellekim1/Sy92FC6Es Markdown:

12/06/2022

Social media and technology are like junk food for your brain. You can look for the definition of that word using a dictionary, or you can do a simple Google search. You can feel rewarded by going on a hike, or you can watch movies in the comfort of your own home. But after a while, junk food makes you sick. After people have grown increasingly dependent on their technology and started to feel overwhelmed and depressed, they adopted a digital detox, which promotes withdrawing from technology or the source of stress within the technology, kind of like a juice detox.

New York Times, Digital Detox

Technology has allowed us to find easy, instant solutions to our needs and this have caused us to be increasingly reliant. Gomez’s sentiment on the target group that is more susceptible to technology addiction was insightful in the sense that he accounts for both younger generations, who have grown up with technology, as well as the older generation, who are adjusting to the growth of technology. He supports this notion by claiming “a number of sources that argued technology is not stressful for young people … newer articles supported by research studies suggest pushback is very much a result of stress felt by all ages.” Different generations use different modes of technology in different ways. However, the negative consequences experienced by both groups indicate that technology harms our biological well-being.

As a digital native myself, I resonated with the feelings of teens within the research survey who claimed they needed to disconnect from social media often. Humans are biologically unfit to be looking at a screen for 7-8 hours a day. This artificial nature of technology in our lives was increasingly clear from our negative experiences in quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic. From this experience, we observed other around us who has lost motivation and self-esteem. Research has also shown higher cases of depression during this period. Furthermore, our modern society has experienced increased physical consequences from increased technology usage. The most significant consequences are overall increases in obesity and the decline in eyesight within our population. Negative traits gained from technology usage will be passed down to future generations, as they are heritable. The accumulation of this genetic information causes the human genome to be more prone to mutations and selection.

In a social sense, the views of our society towards technological development have shifted from fascination to functionality. We see the limitations of technology through the failure of advancements, such as the Google glass, which was discontinued after its release in 2013. At its peak, Snapchat also had a similar development, called the Snapchat Spectacles, which was also meant to be a revolutionary way of integrating Snapchat into our lives. While technological advancement and social media have changed the backbone of our society, we have also seen limitations in the sense that people are deterred from unfamiliar technology.

Google Glass

As a member of our society, I saw the sentiment of social media shift. In the early 2010s felt and others were excited about technology. Americans obsessed over Flappy Bird. Everyone was playing Candy Crush and Angry Birds. As we became more desensitized to the developments in technology, people use technology as a means for connecting with others, rather than to use the technology itself. All in all, as people learn to grow in the environment of technology, they have realized that too much results in an unhappy life. In turn, they have found ways to place technology for their purposes, rather than to mindlessly consume media. [https://www.gravatar.com/avatar/819dc6e6036c1142e7ec0fe6c8b2c279?s=400]https://hackmd.io/@michellekim1/Sy92FC6Es Reading Responses (Set 2) - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/@michellekim1/Sy92FC6Es

Reading Responses (Set 2) #### 11/01/2022 How has digital communication changed the relational l

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Regards,

Michelle Kim ​Pronouns: She/Her/Hers B.S. Cell and Molecular Biology College of Science, Northeastern University


Jhoonho Kim <kim.jh>

Homepage: https://hackmd.io/@jkim22/rya9Z_aeo

Reading Responses 2:https://hackmd.io/@jkim22/SJZenu04o


Isabel Larsen <larsen.i>

Here is the link: https://hackmd.io/@izzylarsen22/BytsEcGrs [https://www.gravatar.com/avatar/6902396bf39513688ffc8f18a0a675ac?s=400]https://hackmd.io/@izzylarsen22/BytsEcGrs Reading Responses 2 - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/@izzylarsen22/BytsEcGrs

Reading Responses 2 ## Ads There is nothing worse than an annoying pop-up ad that disrupts the dis

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Here is the Markdown:

Pushback

Social media has lost its touch. As mentioned by authors Gomez and Morrison in Pushback: The growth of expressions of resistance to constant online connectivity, many people are bidding their Facebooks goodbye. I for one, feel similarly to that of the testimony shared of Stephanie Painter, who bid her Facebook friends goodbye with one last poke before deactivating her account. Social media has become very performative. In the new age of media, people expect your life to be a certain level of exciting. When in the light of influencer, you are expected to uphold a certain level of entertainment for your audience. This may be why I relate so heavily to Painter’s concerns of “issues of privacy and control” (Gomez & Morrison, 5). I begin to push back. I start to want to do the opposite of what all my internet “fans” so incessantly request of me. I begin to dread the meetings I have to pretend to enjoy with different brand groups I partner with, as I have to put on my “Izzy on Instagram” face. The authors mention the concept of “unplugging”, a luxury I am jealous of many people for having. In the role I have, I do not have the ability to shut off my platform. Monetized, paid ads and content are on strict schedules and require a lot of attention and posting. A shut down period would lose me the endorsements I have spent my entire basketball career gaining. So where does this lead me? Well, I face burn out, identity crises, and animosity towards people who do not have this lifestyle. It has negatively impacted the way I view social media as a whole. I no longer see it as an outlet to be myself, but rather a product that I am trying to promote and sell. So, this is where my pushback stems from. My desire to run away from the business that is social media influencing. Maybe soon I will finally find my own way to “unplug” from the madness of it all.


Devon Muldoon <muldoon.d>

Home Page https://hackmd.io/SW-I0E_NQg-GEXjgAYdbog?both Reading Response Page (Completed Second Set) <https://hackmd.io/gskytuEeQNybaPefoohTyA)

Dec 06 Tue - Pushback

Commentary is an essential part of life. It is how we share information, create discussions, and show interest in our everyday lives. Whether it is having a debate in a class, expressing your opinion on a new TV show with your friends, or posting a review on a restaurant, comments fuel our society. Without commentary and engagement, it is impossible to make improvements and achieve an understanding in a discussion. But can commentary be taken too far and become uncontrollable? Yes, and it has become an arising issue on social media and other online platforms across the web. As described in chapter eight of Joseph Reagle’s book “Reading the Comments,” many online websites and blogs have begun to turn off comment sections in an attempt to control the messages being posted on their articles. Companies such as the Blog site Boing Boing have struggled to maintain a positive relationship with the comment section. In fact, in 2003 the blog chose to take down the comment section altogether but was quickly adopted back into the site after the company realized that preventing users from commenting was “a passing fad: it did not last, and unruly comment did.” Boing Boing has now adopted a new hybrid system of forums and comments that many other companies such as Gawker media have implemented. The Discourse System allows users to comment “off the main page, and a moderator can promote select comments to the story’s page.” This new hybrid system has been proven effective by many companies as it has been able to mediate comments, producing intentional and thought-provoking discussions.

Online comments are often posted out of impulse and are intentionally controversial to insight banter. But should comments always be restricted online? Although online commentary can be inappropriate and “inflammatory” I think it can be demeaning to users when companies choose to limit commenting as it suggests that the users are unable to control their behavior in the comments. I understand when it is an academic site such as the New York Times that promotes educated commentary but for other platforms such as Instagram and Youtube, I think the nature of the content on those sites provokes inappropriate comments.


Tam Nhu Phan <phan.t>

https://hackmd.io/@n63MDWEuTjy_ab3nTORl6Q/rycy4fAeo [https://graph.facebook.com/5363284547121774/picture?width=400]https://hackmd.io/@n63MDWEuTjy_ab3nTORl6Q/rycy4fAeo Tam Phan’s Home Page - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/@n63MDWEuTjy_ab3nTORl6Q/rycy4fAeo

tags: CDA # Tam Phan’s Home Page ## Required assignments 1. [Wiki tutorial](https://reag

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tags: CDA

Tam’s Reading Responses

Reading responses 5 out of 5

Nov 4 Fri - Ads & social graph background

When I was younger, I used to get so frustrated every time I had to click on the “stop showing me this ad” button because Google would always be like, “Oops, nah, I don’t believe I will.” Then, in the Fall of 2021, I did my first Co-op at Ogilvy where I got to use cookies and databases provided by our client to advertise products. It blew my mind. For marketers, these things are beneficial to ensure that we can reach our target markets and reach the right people. Because seeing irrelevant ads is pointless for both the firm and the viewer. Thus, if we look at the situation in a positive light, if we had to view advertising every day whether we want to or not, wouldn’t it be much better if it was for things we truly wanted or were interested in? Just last week, I was on the phone with a friend talking about how I’ve been craving Malatang, a Chinese street food, but don’t know where to get it. The next day, a Malatang restaurant was recommended to my friend and me on our TikTok so we wouldn’t have to seek it ourselves. Moreover, by gathering your information, entertainment platforms such as TikTok, YouTube, and Facebook may better propose content that is more appropriate to your preferences. Isn’t that wonderful? To conclude, I do believe that internet privacy is a major concern and that we, as customers, should be informed about it before making any decisions. However, everything has two sides, and we as rational internet users should always consider both sides of a situation before making any final judgment in our life.

Nov 8 Tue - Manipulated

As Joseph Reagle detailed in Reading the Comments Chapter 3: “Manipulated: Which Ice Cube is the Best?”,“10 to 30 percent of online reviews are fake. The cast of manipulators includes fakers (those who deceptively praise their own works or pillory others’), makers (those who will do so for a fee), and the takers (those who avail themselves of such services).” During my first Co-op, I was one of those makers. Specifically, I was interning at Ogilvy agency, where one of my duties was to pretend to be a mother who uses Nuti Food’s milk for her newborn child and reviews the company’s product for other mothers on Facebook.

A funny story that my manager often tells people is that as a teenager, Picasso was an unknown, poor painter in Paris. When there were only 15 silver coins left, Picasso decided to hire students to walk around the painting shops and ask: “- Do you sell Picasso paintings here?” In less than a month, his name spread throughout Paris, paintings sold out in a very short time. And seeding was born from that time. During my Co-op, I have to come up with 200 seeding comments per day the Nuti’s new product. It was not fun, and I felt disgusted about lying to other people like that. But it is one of the marketer’s jobs. We are all liars.

Additionally, “people traffic in the illicit markets of comment, some click alike in hopes of a discount, diners loudly discuss Yelp when their server is nearby, restaurateurs give coupons in exchange for reviews, authors ask friends to write reviews” Joseph Reagle (2018). By doing this “favor” for brands, companies, or even our friends, we became one of those manipulators on the internet and have contributed to one more false comment. So, the issue is, how can you trust and how would you know if it is a seeded comment or not, given the volume of comments, contents, and posts that are posted on social media?

Nov 18 Fri - Algorithmic discrimination

“It’s only reflecting the way society searches” Google (2016). Are we, the internet users, the one who is racist, or Google is the ones? Up to this time, this is not the first time that Google facing claims of racism and discrimination. But is it true that they’re using their algorithm to discriminate against different races?

In 2009, when someone typed “Michelle Obama” into the popular search engine Google, one of the first images that came up was a picture of the American first lady altered to resemble a monkey. Google then deleted the image and apologized for the incident and said that “Sometimes Google search results from the Internet can include disturbing content, even from innocuous queries. We assure you that the views expressed by such sites are not in any way endorsed by Google.” This droves netizen to 2 different sides. Some said that the Internet has thousands and thousands of offensive images. Should Google get rid of all of them? How can they be able to do it? While the other side argues that Google should point out the person that was behind this picture. Alheli Picazo (2009) said “People often claim their right to free speech to mask blatant racism and insulting bigotry and always seem to get away with it,” she told CNN via e-mail. “When it comes to issues of discrimination, hiding behind free speech just doesn’t cut it.”

I do not know whether this racist incident is based on Google’s algorithm or not. But being accused of such things from ten years ago and until now? Google should really step up the game and really think of a way to solve all of these problems.

### Nov 29 Tue - Collapsed context Instagram has long been a favorite social networking platform for people who love to edit and post their photos, or to put it trendy. But BeReal is challenging that situation in a different way. This application is “making a hit wave” among users. However, BeReal’s, in my opinion, more of a trend than a long-term dominant social media app like Facebook, Instagram, or TikTok, and in the end, users will have to continue and come back to use platforms that have repeatedly been identified as “harmful” to them over the years. Because the present world is so harsh, some individuals use social media to find and live a better version of themselves. They find joy in everyone’s compliments and envious glances. They adore creating their ideal lives there. But even if BeReal is just a trend that fades away soon, it truly serves to highlight a social media issue that is already present: younger users are selecting platforms with less friend-focused features and instead focus on themselves more.

### Dec 02 Fri - Authenticity, work, & influence “If someone who is 20 years old watching YouTube or Instagram sees these people traveling with brands, promoting brands, I don’t see why they wouldn’t do everything they could to get in on that,” said Alyssa Vingan Klein. This is so true, especially for me. I always feel like being an influencer can give you so many advantages such as can making money at a very young age, becoming financially independent, and can afford everything you want as well as being famous. According to Rachel Lerman, influencers “often earn between $100 and more than $1,000 per post, depending on how big their following is.”

But I also realize that becoming an influencer is more complicated than it seems. The shift from a typical Instagram or YouTube user to a professional “influencer”—that is, someone who uses a social media following to influence others and earn money—is not simple, according to Taylor Lorenz (2018). The quantity of content they must create each day, the risk to their health and to their skin when testing new products, the danger they take in order to attract attention, and the possibility that they will at any time offend followers and face a boycott if they do anything wrong, those kinds of things is the reason why I step down and not ready to give it a try. Additionally, after the epidemic, the number of influencers in the profession increased significantly, making it harder for someone to succeed in the industry Rachel Lerman (2020).

Best Regards,


Tam Nhu Phan

Northeastern University | D’Amore McKim School of Business

Candidate for BS in Business Administration & Communication Studies

E: mailto:perezaguasanchez-b.m@northeastern.edu

T: +84 916 480 480 | +1 (682) 202 9666

[cid:d2433290-ed1c-4ba1-ba1e-0d87649a4d7d]


Gabriella Playa <playa.g>

https://hackmd.io/@gabbyplaya11/Hy0uLpaEs [https://www.gravatar.com/avatar/d9074933ab86b5ee1e6c0981255a5c49?s=400]https://hackmd.io/@gabbyplaya11/Hy0uLpaEs Reading Responses Set 2 - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/@gabbyplaya11/Hy0uLpaEs

Reading Responses Set 2 #### Gabriella Playa
## Reading Response 1 ### November 1, 2022

hackmd.io

Reading Response 5

December 6, 2022 - Pushback

Are we the negative commenter we claim to hate online? When reading “Commenterrible”, specifically the section about “Hot or Not”, I realized we absolutely are. Back when I first got Instagram, around 2014, my peers would post a screen that said, “Like for a TBH & rate”, then proceed to rate you on a number scale and make a comment on your personality. Now, I’m not quite sure what exactly the criteria were for the number rating, but I believe because we were 11 years old, I will say it was how much they liked you on a scale of 1-10. This trend was very toxic, just as “Hot or Not” most definitely was when it was at its peak.

Morrison touches exactly on the toxicity I am discussing here. The study “Why Facebook is Making People Sad” directly correlates the amount of time students spend on media – specifically Facebook – and their recorded level of unhappiness (5). These days you will see forms of “digital detoxing” when an influencer needs a break from hate comments. I myself have had to take a break at times, committing some form of “Facebook suicide” by deleting or deactivating certain accounts.

The entire question is if we are actually better not reading, or just overall turning off our comments online. A lot of influencers tend to turn off their comments when they enter a scandal, to avoid being mocked. My stance is that we should not turn off our comments and read them. Commenters will always find another place to comment their thoughts. I believe it is at times the person reading the comments that gives them power, though in some cases, when receiving serious threats, I would definitely adjust my stance.


Michael Puzzanghera <puzzanghera.m>

Hi Professor,

Attached is the markdown for my reading response for tomorrow’s class. The link to my page is herehttps://hackmd.io/@mpuzz/BJLbULDSj.

Thanks, Mike

How do you know when it’s time to push back against technology? As constant consumers of technology, the average member of today’s society is connected almost 24/7. Between smartphones, tablets, laptops, and all other forms of technology, there is always a way to reach someone. So in a time where that kind of connection is seemingly needed, how does one determine when they should ease off it?

Society almost demands constant connection. There’s comfort in knowing that should you need to contact someone instantly, you can reach them in a matter of seconds. But with that said, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. The idea of pushback is one of resisting against that near-constant use.

As Ricardo Gomez and Stacy Morgan describe, there are five primary motivations for pushback: Emotional dissatisfaction, external values, taking back control, addiction, and privacy.

Each motivation has its reasons for why the person is pushing back, but they can offer a guide to knowing when to initiate that pushback. It can be difficult to start pushing back against technology use, particularly for those who have had technology as a part of their lives now since they were born — for many, it is the only way they know how to live. But by paying attention to usage and satisfaction from tech, users can see when they should ease up.


Katherine Quan <quan.k>

Link: https://hackmd.io/@quank/H192LiT4s Markdown for 5th response:

Dec 06 Tue - Pushback

The concept of technology pushback seems to be increasing. Almost an contradiction, the more advanced and connected these platforms grow to be, the more wary we become of them— even though that was the initial goal in the first place. As listed in the study conducted by Gomez and Morrison, the five main motivations and behaviors that are associated with pushback include emotional dissatisfaction, addiction, privacy, social agreement, tech control, behavior adaptation, etc. Users often find themselves feeling overwhelmed with the amount of stimuli, resulting in information overload, resistance, techno-stress, and ultimately disconnecting. An example of this is the resistance against comments in online spaces. People would rather shut off that aspect of interaction on the internet due to the negative byproducts it can often bring, whether they’re warranted or not. Reagle describes this phenomenon as individuals sometimes preferring “not to look into the online reflecting glass of humanity” to avoid “feeling a little worse about themselves” (Reagle 2019). This practice is understandable, especially considering the amount of online hate and bullying nowadays, as we discussed in earlier class sessions.

Many individuals are seen to be taking a step back from social media and the internet, be it your average user or extremely popular influencers with massive followings. Some of my friends have felt the need to deactivate their accounts for a period of time for the sake of their mental health— especially from TikTok and Instagram. The amount of stimulation these apps give can be extremely damaging, and it’s important to recognize when it becomes too much for oneself. According to Valko in her article on Highly Sensitive Refuge, it causes the comparison game, ignites FOMO (fear of missing out), and emotional hangover, especially to highly sensitive people. In fact, a study conducted in 2012 revealed that “the size of someone’s online network is closely linked to how the brain processes social thoughts,” suggesting the very likely possibility that the brain finds it difficult to distinguish online relationships from offline ones (Valko 2021). Consequently, it makes us feel like we should always be doing more and looking a different way. In reality, we shouldn’t be absorbing so much data and information about this many people’s lives at once. The normalization of this is one of the biggest contributors to technology pushback.


Simone Ritcheson <ritcheson.s>

Hi Professor, Here is my Reading Response Set 2, with my fifth reading response included at the bottom. https://hackmd.io/@m-5shBw3S0eHwcLzT0UR6Q/SyXxYXdEo Thank you, Simone


Caroline Sweeney <sweeney.c>

Homepage: https://hackmd.io/6jV_NiyLT-ymwTX4XdJaJQ?both Reading Response Set 2: https://hackmd.io/-QrkwG32SPignCbQ082Mug Reading Response 5: https://hackmd.io/Rz1VwstqSwuhhX20zilr8Q

Markdown:

Reading Response 5

Pushback

My Screen Time Report has the power to make or break my mood for the week. Getting the Apple notification saying, “Your Weekly Report is available,” creates an overwhelming, yet temporary, feeling of either guilt or relief as I unlock my phone to check the stats over the last seven days. This week, for example, I spent an average of 4 hours and 52 minutes on my phone, totaling a whopping 34 hours and 10 minutes for the week. As much as it kills me to admit, this is actually one of the lower reports I have gotten. My daily average of “pickups,” which refers to how many times I checked my phone notifications whether unlocking the screen or not, clocked in at 797 for the week. I am by no means proud of this number, in fact, I would say that I generally am able to stay off my phone for long periods of time without feeling uncomfortable or antsy. Gomez’s interpretation of “pushback” actually helped me put into words what I try to accomplish on a weekly basis. The idea of pushback refers to an expression of those who have access to and use communication technologies, but who decide to resist, drop off, manage or reduce their use of these technologies. Admittedly, my total screen time report may not seem as though I attempted to put this idea into practice, however, I often found myself trying to limit and manage time spent on my phone. The act of pushback requires a certain level of self-control that I fear many in my generation lack. For example, I’ve witnessed my young cousins operate an iPad and Apple TV, yet they cannot tie their shoes. I was not raised with a tablet in my hand (thankfully), but I know many who were. The dependency a person has towards technology is solely determined by how they grew up. I think parents can learn a thing or two from how things “used to be.” Maybe a little pushback from an early age would be a good thing.


Vienna Volinsky <volinsky.v>

Link: https://hackmd.io/HiEIL-OXREebH7InW4GeJg#Reading-Responses-Set-2 [https://hackmd.io/images/media/HackMD-og.jpg]https://hackmd.io/HiEIL-OXREebH7InW4GeJg#Reading-Responses-Set-2 Reading Responses Set 2 - HackMDhttps://hackmd.io/HiEIL-OXREebH7InW4GeJg#Reading-Responses-Set-2 hackmd.io

Vienna Volinsky (she/her) Northeastern University | College of Arts, Media, and Design Linguistics and Communication Studies Major


Zhudele Zhao <zhao.zhud>

Home page: https://hackmd.io/yMck0JSsRN6p9ddYsIYE3A?both Reading response: https://hackmd.io/oVgkbH40RESejhnJwad-Lg

Markdown:

Reading Responses (set2)

Nov 04 - Ads & social graph background

I’m sure most people are familiar with online advertisements. When I was watching this video by Vox, a pop-up ad window was on the side showing a shopping site I just visited a few days ago. Advertisers use third-party cookies to collect data, such as which websites you visited, in order to present the most relevant and tailored content to certain audiences. Such targeted advertising is indeed very effective for advertisers. Just as Robe (2014) mentioned, “Banner advertising can see an increase in search volume”. Throughout the article, he also explained how online advertising works and why it’s beneficial for businesses. Customers can be exposed to digital ads no matter where they are, so long as they have access to the internet. Because “it is the fact that it is an advertiser’s medium that keeps it free”. What if users do not want to be tracked. According to the video, even if users are given the opportunity to block third-party cookies, it is still difficult to avoid tracking. Because firms like Google and Facebook can provide websites with code that appears to be a first-party cookie but transfers all data to a third party instead. Also, I strongly agree with what Lou (in Vox, 2020) said, “advertising-only business model has caused products to become less good than they could be”. Nowadays, good marketing is the best way to sell, quality does not seem that matters anymore.

Nov 18 - Algorithmic discrimination

Cathy O’Neil (2016)’s Weapons of Math Destruction explores into the world of Big Data and its insidious, fast-growing control over almost every aspect of modern life. Algorithms are likely to increase inequality in the United States. O’Neil gives some frightening examples of how much harm algorithms can cause. For example, algorithmic discrimination. Many users have noted that the search engine’s image results appear to reinforce Eurocentric beauty standards. People noticed that searching “beauty” yielded few results featuring people of color. According to Fiona (2016), “the results Google generates are determined by the search engine’s constantly evolving algorithm”. In machine learning, algorithms rely on multiple data sets, or training data, that specify what the correct outputs are for certain people or objects. “Once their model morphs into a belief, it becomes hardwired” (Cathy, 2016). A model is learned from the training data that can be used to predict the correct outputs for new people or objects.

Dec 02 Fri - Authenticity, work, & influence

During the coronavirus pandemic, people spent significantly more time at home scrolling through Instagram, TikTok and YouTube. While these influencers documented much of their lives, they also interspersed videos and photos with numerous advertisements. This has fundamentally changed the way many young consumers shop. Influencers with tens of thousands or even millions of followers can make or break a product, or even sell out in seconds, with just one well-placed post. According to Rachel (2020), “companies spent an estimated $5.2 billion on influencer marketing on Instagram alone in 2019”. GOMIBLOG, an abbreviation for Get Off My Internets, is possibly the most well-known influential hateblog, with tens of thousands of registered users and monthly visitors. Not only are the forums dominated by feminine genres of social media creation, but the vast majority of the threads focus on female influencers who have established a big following on Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, and/or personal blogs. However, authenticity is really very vague on the Internet, according to Brooke (2022), one GOMI member, for instance, noted the supposed contradiction of an influencer who “pretends she doesn’t care about aging but totally dyes her grey hair”. Sometimes it is just very hard for people to tell “if an influencer genuinely loves a product, is being paid to talk about it, or just wants to be paid to talk about it” (Taylor, 2018)

Nov 08 - Manipulated

The biggest impression after reading these two articles is that all the business relying on the Internet is the clout business. Many companies are making efforts to strive for clout. One way to earn a long-term and loyal audience is Instagram pods. Instagram Pods are invite-only groups of Instagram users, businesses, or brands who have a similar following. The purpose of building a Pod is to connect with a community of like-minded Instagrammers and naturally help one another boost followers and engagement. One thing that pods are better than buying fans and using bots is that Instagram Pods are made of real people with real Instagram accounts liking and commenting on photos, for real. Companies and brands are trying to “trick Instagram’s algorithm” (Caroline, 2018) to win more audience for them. Posts are not the only thing that manipulated online, as well as the fake reviews and ratings. Some utilize false reviews to help apps and products that would otherwise would not give a second look. There is “ ‘loss of innocence’ with online discussions, comments, and reviews of products” (Joseph, 2015). If a product is not even shown to the public, it will not be purchased. Pods and fake reviews are emerging as a way for businesses to trick the algorithm and profit from it, reflecting the growing importance of clout nowadays.

Nov 01 - Finding someone & living alone

It is not surprising to find out that “living alone has become increasingly prevalent in developed countries” (Joseph, 2021). Individuals in more developed countries are less reliant on the welfare functions given by their families, and hence have more freedom in making the decision to live alone. Comparing the pros and cons of living alone, although it costs more but provides more privacy, freedom and independence. Furthermore, living alone provides more freedom to pursue personal interests without fear of criticism or interference from others. Nevertheless, it can lead to social isolation and financial uncertainty. It’s probably because of the rise in the number of people choosing to live alone, combined with the development of the Internet, has contributed to the rise in popularity of online matchmaking. According to Derek (2019), matchmaking sites have officially surpassed friends and family in the world of dating, injecting modern romance with a dose of radical individualism. However, online daters tell lies about height, age, income and etc. People exaggerate their income or appearance on the Internet for the purpose of “ eventually meeting other people in person” (Christian, 2010). Most people here are not deceive others, they mainly tell white lies to make themselves better and just want to get a date.