Thursday, 14 December

11:00 EST

Atari delays planned Ataribox preorders [The Verge - All Posts]

Earlier this week, Atari announced that it would be opening preorders for the Ataribox today, on December 14th, but that no longer seems to be the case. Engadget is reporting that the company has emailed prospective customers that it needs more time "to create the platform and ecosystem the Atari community deserves."

The company is reportedly delaying the preorders for the console while it continues to figure things out. According to Engadget, more information about the new launch plans should be coming in the next few weeks.

But it’s not exactly a resounding vote of confidence for the console, which is set to cost somewhere between $250 and $300 dollars. Along with the now nebulous release window and preorder date, Atari has also...

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This soothing, intricate puzzle game will make you feel like a genius [The Verge - All Posts]

The first time Gorogoa truly clicks is revelatory. The puzzle game is simple at a glance: you’re presented with a grid of four squares, and you can move cards around on those squares. Each card depicts a scene or an object, with hand-drawn art of everything from sunlit parks to elaborate stained glass windows. In some instances, you can manipulate these cards by zooming in or panning the image around.

But the real magic happens when the cards interact with each other. The big moment for me came when I shifted three cards around, placed in just the right spots and set on just the right image, to create an interconnected scene. When it locked in, a bird on one card flew past a tree branch on another and knocked an apple into a bowl. I felt...

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Pandora’s free users can now listen to music on demand after they watch an ad [The Verge - All Posts]

Pandora will now let its ad-supported and Plus users listen to music on demand, after watching a 15-second pre-roll ad. The move, which is a major change for the company’s 72 million users who don’t pay $10 a month for Pandora Premium, gets Pandora’s newest service in the hands of every user, and could help shift a large portion of that user base into paid users, much like Spotify’s free tier has done. Previously, Pandora’s ad-supported and Plus users could only listen to radio stations based on artists or songs they liked.

When users search for a specific album, artist, or song, they will be given an option to view a 15-second video ad to unlock a free Pandora Premium session, allowing them to listen to anything they choose on the...

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Two senators make final call to cancel net neutrality vote [The Verge - All Posts]

Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Angus King, Jr. (I-ME) have sent a last-minute letter calling for FCC chairman Ajit Pai to cancel today’s net neutrality vote. “Repealing the FCC’s net neutrality rules will undermine long-standing protections that that have ensured the open internet as a powerful and transformative platform of innovation and economic opportunity,” they write. “We respectfully ask that the commission cancel the vote on the proposed order as scheduled and give Congress and the FCC the time to hold public hearings in 2018.”

This letter comes on the heels of previous letters from lawmakers in both the Republican and Democratic party, as well as earlier criticism of the rule from Collins. As with previous efforts, it’s unlikely...

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In case you forgot about Despacito, here’s a mash-up of the year in pop [The Verge - All Posts]

Every year, DJ Earworm releases a mash-up of the most popular songs of the year, dubbed “The United States of Pop.” Today he released the 2017 version, unsurprisingly backboned by “Despacito,” a hugely popular single worldwide and currently the most-viewed YouTube video of all time.

Usually this mash-up is a good indicator of the current major trends in music, and, as Billboard points out, 2017’s version has a lighter, more tropical vibe than years past. While the “United States of Pop” videos from 2015 and 2016 feel like slinky bedroom tracks, this year’s is much more jittery, full of steel drums, dancehall beats, and, of course, “Bodak Yellow.”

Here’s the full list of songs sampled:

Bruno Mars - "That's What I Like"

Camila Cabello...

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Why Horizon Zero Dawn is my game of the year [The Verge - All Posts]

It’s been a shockingly packed year for great new video games. Over the course of the last 12 months, it seemed like there was never really a pause, or a moment when there wasn’t something interesting to play. To celebrate, this week Verge staff will be publishing essays on their favorite releases of the year, the games that spoke to us personally. Expect to see a new one each morning, culminating in a list of our collective 15 favorite games of 2017 on Friday. You can keep up with it all right here.

Playing Horizon Zero Dawn for the first time was a good reminder that I'm an idiot.

It had been less than two years since I watched Guerilla Games unveil its latest project at an E3 2015 press conference. Watching that first six-minute video...

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90 Seconds on The Verge: The End [The Verge - All Posts]

"I hope they are watching. They'll see. This is my gift. My curse. And for a moment, I thought we were in trouble. I do wish we could chat longer, but... I'm having an old friend for dinner. I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship. Now we are free. I will see you again, but not yet. Not yet. And like that... poof... they're gone. Good night, and good luck." (Final production notes)

The FCC’s own chief technology officer emailed concerns about net neutrality repeal plan [The Verge - All Posts]

In an email sent to FCC commissioners’ offices this week, the agency’s chief technology officer expressed concerns about today’s net neutrality repeal proposal, according to a report from Politico.

The publication, citing FCC sources, reports that Eric Burger, who took the CTO job in October, wrote in the email that the proposal failed to properly account for concerns about blocking or throttling websites. "Unfortunately, I realize we do not address that at all," Burger wrote, according to Politico. "If the ISP is transparent about blocking legal content, there is nothing the [Federal Trade Commission] can do about it unless the FTC determines it was done for anti-competitive...

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10:00 EST

Disney to buy part of 21st Century Fox for $52 billion [Ars Technica]

Enlarge (credit: 20th Century Fox)

Disney announced today that it will acquire a huge portion of 21st Century Fox in an all-stock deal valued at $52.4 billion. As part of the deal, Disney will own 21st Century Fox's film and television studios, some of its cable networks, and international TV businesses, as well as popular titles including The Simpsons, X-Men, and Avatar. The deal represents a huge shift in content ownership in Hollywood, giving Disney even more titles, characters, and stories to build upon across all its existing properties and any new services the company debuts in the future.

Disney did not acquire all of 21st Century Fox—the deal focuses on the company's entertainment businesses. 21st Century Fox announced plans to spin off its news and sports broadcasting businesses into a new company dubbed "Fox." This company will focus on news and sports and will include Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network, FS1, FS2, among other properties.

If the deal gains regulatory approval, Disney's already gigantic pool of content will expand even further. The company will own cable channels including National Geographic, FX Networks, Fox Sports Regional Networks, and international networks like Star TV and Sky. 21st Century Fox is expected to complete its acquisition of Sky, a popular network in the UK and Europe, by mid-2018. If and when it does so, Disney will own all of Sky.

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FCC's Own Chief Technology Officer Warned About Net Neutrality Repeal [Slashdot]

Margaret Harding McGill, reporting for Politico: The Federal Communications Commission's own chief technology officer expressed concern Wednesday about Republican Chairman Ajit Pai's plan to repeal the net neutrality rules, saying it could lead to practices that are "not in the public interest." In an internal email to all of the FCC commissioner offices, CTO Eric Burger, who was appointed by Pai in October, said the No. 1 issue with the repeal is concern that internet service providers will block or throttle specific websites, according to FCC sources who viewed the message. "Unfortunately, I realize we do not address that at all," Burger said in the email. "If the ISP is transparent about blocking legal content, there is nothing the [Federal Trade Commission] can do about it unless the FTC determines it was done for anti-competitive reasons. Allowing such blocking is not in the public interest."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft Unveils Improved AI-powered Search Features for Bing [Slashdot]

Microsoft unveiled a handful of new intelligent search features for Bing at an event held in San Francisco this week. From a report: Powered by AI, the search updates are meant to provide more thorough answers and allow for more conversational or general search queries. First, when answering a question, Bing will now validate its answers by sourcing a number of websites, not just one. And in cases where there are two valid perspectives, like, for example, in response to the question, "Is cholesterol bad," they'll be aggregated and Bing will show both at the top of the search page. Additionally, when there's more than one way to answer a query, Bing will provide a carousel of answers. The Bing team is also adding relevant analogies or comparisons to search answers that make the provided information easier to understand. [...] Bing will also help users find answers to broad or conversational queries by asking clarifying questions that will help refine the search. And Microsoft also introduced Bing's advanced image search capabilities, which will now let users search images or objects within images to, for example, help them track down a particular fashion item they'd like to purchase.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Antarctic Ice [NeuroLogica Blog]

Perhaps one of the most underrated science stories of 2017 was the separation of a massive iceberg the size of Delaware from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica. That is because this is not an isolated event, but just a dramatic part of a larger story – the melting of Antarctica.

Antarctica contains most of the ice on Earth (90%). Much of that ice sits on top of land, unlike Arctic ice which is floating. When floating ice melts it just fills the space that it had displaced. There is a little bit a sea rise due to rising temperatures – water expands as it warms. But this amount of sea rise is small overall. When ice that was sitting on land flows into the ocean, it raises the sea level more significantly.

Antarctica is comprised of glaciers sitting on top of the continent, which itself is mostly below sea level. These glaciers are as thick as three miles. They are divided into a western glacier system and an eastern glacier system. West Antarctica, which is melting faster, contains enough ice to raise the sea level by 14 feet. East Antarctica is more stable but still showing some early signs of melting. All the ice here could raise the sea level by 175 feet.

As the glaciers melt during the warmer months they follow channels out to the ocean. These channels, however, are blocked by ice shelves, which act like a cork, keeping back the ice and helping to maintain the stability of the glaciers.

The ice shelves themselves have a certain structure – they rest on the sea floor but as they extend out from the continent eventually the ice lifts off the sea floor (called the grounding point) and as the ice extends out further it is floating on top of the water. The breakup of these ice shelves is a concern, because that would essentially remove the stopper and greatly accelerate the rate at which glacier melt finds its way to the ocean.

What recent research has shown is that warm ocean water is traveling along channels under the Antarctic ice shelves, melting the underside of the shelves and eating away at the grounding point. This is weakening the ice shelves, increasing the rate at which they break up. The giant Larsen C iceberg was a symptom of this phenomenon.

As the ice shelves weaken, the rate at which the glaciers move to the sea is accelerating. Essentially ice forming and melting in the Antarctic has been in a homeostasis, and now that balance has shifted with melting happening faster than ice is being replaced. There seems to be no question at this point that Antarctica is changing. Even without any further release of CO2 or warming, the warming we have already caused has shifted the equilibrium. Some scientists estimate that existing warming will result in a sea level rise of about 10 feet. Of course, further warming will only make this worse.

Really the big question for Antarctica is when – will it be 50 years or 500 years before the ice shelves disintegrate completely and significant glacial ice finds its way into the ocean? There is the possibility of a domino effect, because the ice is holding back further ice. As it collapses, the ice behind it is then unstable and may collapse. Scientists are concerned because much of the increased melting is happening under the surface ice. The ice shelves and glaciers are being hollowed out, forming pockets and streams of water below the surface. At some point the system may collapse.

It is always difficult to warn about possible future calamity. It is easy to come off sounding hysterical, and critics can easily paint you that way, even if you are being sober and careful. Further, with many natural phenomena there is always uncertainty. How bad will an epidemic be? What are the odds of that asteroid hitting the Earth? What will the effects of the Y2K bug be?

The thing is, it is reasonable to prepare for and attempt to prevent possible negative outcomes based upon our best current estimate. It is unreasonable, even folly, to demand near 100% certainty before taking reasonable steps to prevent harm. And of course if you are successful, then the critics can always claim that there was never any risk.

So, we don’t know exactly what is going to happen in Antarctica or when. What scientists can see, however, is that the rate of melting is increasing, the ice shelves are becoming unstable, and this is further increasing the rate at which glacial ice is finding its way to the sea. They cannot sea the future, but they can make reasonable inferences and warn about possible threats. It’s good to know what the range of possibilities is – what is the best and worst case scenario. Generally speaking we should prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

You can also take a risk vs benefit approach. What is the risk of doing nothing? What is the risk and expense of taking specific steps to mitigate anthropogenic warming? Obviously you don’t want the cure to be worse than the disease. But let’s take a sober look at the “disease.”

Even a modest 10 feet of sea level rise (modest compared to the potential from Antarctic ice melting) will flood the southern tip of Florida, will flood many coastal cities, and displace millions of people. Further, with rising sea levels storm surges will be much worse. Coastal flooding from storms can be devastating. The cost would likely rise into the trillions. That is not even the worst case.

I think that justifies taking some aggressive steps to mitigate further climate change. Our technology is already heading in the direction of renewable energy sources. They are getting cheaper, they are distributed, and they reduce pollution. They also reduce dependence on a limited resource, one that often comes from unstable parts of the world. Energy efficiency technology saves everyone money, so they are a win-win. Accelerating the development and adoption of superior technology is a no-brainer. It is only being opposed by vested interests in the status quo.

We would do well to heed the warnings of our scientists, especially when there are some obviously beneficial steps we can take.

Report from AnthropologyCon: Designing Games for Classrooms and Research [ProfHackerProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education]

Cards Against Humanity flickr photo by Brett Jordan shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Earlier this month I stepped outside of my usual disciplinary (and transdisciplinary) spaces and attended the big conference of another discipline: the American Anthropological Association. I arrived in DC not quite sure what to expect, invited by the team behind AnthropologyCon: a game design workshop bringing together anthropologists interested in, or already actively engaging, games in their research and teaching. The conversation and game-making followed turned out from my disciplinary outsider perspective to be a great example of the type of productive, communal conversation that game design needs, particularly for those of us seeking to find new ways to engage and collaborate with our students.

In the introduction to the workshop, the team (including Samuel Collins, Edward Gonzalez-Tennant, Krista Harper, Matthew Durington, Marc Lorenc, Fiona McDonald, and Nicholas Mizer) discuss the appeal of serious games for anthropology in terms that I definitely relate to even as a anthropology outsider:

Game designer Eric Zimmerman recently proclaimed the 21st century to be the “Ludic Century.” Jane McGonigal has written that “reality is broken” and games may be the solution for helping people think through social problems. The American Museum of Natural History recently featured “Social Impact Games”, based on social science, to explore concepts of race and issues of sweatshop workers. Anthropologists can and should be more involved in this emerging field, because of our role in studying and imagining different ways of engaging with the world, and our interest in exploring multimodal platforms for the dissemination of anthropological ideas.

The team produced a creative commons licensed booklet with resources from the event, Gaming Anthropology. The booklet is inspired by a zine approach to sharing reflective research and pedagogy (not unlike what we strive for here at ProfHacker), and includes reflections on teaching, design, and research that suggest models for those thinking about “serious” games. Several games that might be of interest to those looking to build games with and for their students and research were featured at the event and highlighted in these resources, including Cards Against Anthropology, a mod set of the very popular Cards Against Humanity designed in collaboration with students. Cards Against Humanity itself is a fascinating social game with its own somewhat serious game initiative making headlines right now, Cards Against Humanity Saves America. The game is also a compelling example of a hyper-flexible set of mechanics that can be applied to a number of different situations. For more context on Cards Against Humanity and some of the challenges its cardset can present, I highly recommend Edmond Chang’s essay “Cards Against Humanity is ____,” in which he notes: “much of the humor in Cards Against Humanity is really about playing with and playing up race, gender, sexuality, stereotypes, and difference. Often cards combine all of these logics and identities together.” Remixing and building upon these game models can be a powerful way for students to see and address the assumptions encoded in the original game mechanics and cards.

Conversations like those I enjoyed at AnthropologyCon, which brought together experimenters in games from around the country, are an invaluable chance to find ideas and rethink one’s own assumptions about what serious games and games in the classroom might bring to the field. It’s also a reminder of how much you can accomplish if you can get a few people committed to sitting down and planning out a game.

It’s amazing what they’ll just come out and say on YouTube [Pharyngula]

Roy Moore lost the election in Alabama, but he refuses to concede. He’s put out a video explaining why. It’s revolting.

After a brief nod to the fact that they’re still counting some military ballots (won’t make a difference to the outcome), he gets around to the real reason. It’s too important to God to allow godless sodomites to have a say in an election. We have to stop abortion, homosexuals, and men who claim to be women, and we need to have prayer in the schools, and Immorality sweeps over our land! To preserve our republic and honor the Constitution, he is going to deny the outcome of an election. Well, gosh, can we also deny the outcome of the last presidential election simply because the asshole-in-chief is an affront to morality?

I don’t think he understands the concept of a republic. Remember that next time some theocrat runs for office — their intent is to destroy that institution.

Hey, you know who else doesn’t understand anything? Carl Benjamin, aka Sargon of Akkad. Benjamin really is a Nazi at heart. He did a hangout with another alt-right fuckwit, MillennialWoes, and they let it all hang out. What is he afraid of?

You’ve got diversity in everything…it’s terrifying, isn’t it?

He’s terrified because…what? Brown people and gay people and women might also get employed and share equal status with his pale right-wing brothers? This is a blatantly racist, anti-egalitarian statement — and he probably wouldn’t consider my criticism a rebuke, but something to be proud of.

He’s also afraid of SJWs, because they’re a fucking massive problem. We have a terrible great power.

…the reason thousands of young girls are getting raped is not because the police didn’t want to do something or couldn’t do something. It was because they were afraid of social justice warriors calling them racist.

That doesn’t even make sense. Say or do something racist, and someone might rightly say to you that you’re a racist, therefore the problem is…people able to point out reality? A policeman might shoot an unarmed black man to death, but that’s OK — the real horror to a Sargoonian is that someone might point to a pattern of such incidents and declare that there is clear evidence of racist oppression. Say it right out loud, in public!

So we need to silence those goddamn SJWs.

The worst case scenario for the alt-right’s success in this endeavor is less intolerable to me and my family than the SJW success. So from a tactical evaluation, I have to choose this angle. I have to try and explain to the alt-right that they can get what they want and they should take this gambit, even if it means the end of liberal democracy.

I don’t think there’s much difference between old Christian theocrats and the new Nazis at this point.

The Hayek revelations [Pharyngula]

Good grief. I just read Salma Hayek’s piece in the New York Times. It’s a horror through and through — Harvey Weinstein is a terrible human being. There was the familiar constant pressure for sex, and his anger when denied, but what’s new here is how Weinstein, who had a reputation for sponsoring great art movies, was in active force in compromising the art. What he did to Hayek’s movie, Frida, was unconscionable.

Halfway through shooting, Harvey turned up on set and complained about Frida’s “unibrow.” He insisted that I eliminate the limp and berated my performance. Then he asked everyone in the room to step out except for me. He told me that the only thing I had going for me was my sex appeal and that there was none of that in this movie. So he told me he was going to shut down the film because no one would want to see me in that role.

Frida Kahlo did many self-portraits, and her striking appearance was part of her identity, and Weinstein wanted to reduce her looks to something more conventional? She was afflicted with polio as a child and severely injured in an accident in her teens, and lived her whole life with a disability and chronic pain, and Weinstein wanted to erase that in a biography? How clueless is he, and how many of the good Weinstein-produced movies were made in spite of his interference, and how much better would they have been if he’d never been allowed to say a word?

He offered me one option to continue. He would let me finish the film if I agreed to do a sex scene with another woman. And he demanded full-frontal nudity.

Christ. Hayek gave in on that demand, reluctantly, and with much anguish. But now you’ll need to keep this in mind next time you watch Game of Thrones or some cop show which features a stroll through a strip joint. The nudity isn’t some critical part of the story, or even a part of the atmosphere added for verisimilitude. It’s probably because some guy high up in the production likes the power of being able to compel the women acting in his show to expose themselves. It’s not that nudity and sex can’t be a natural part of a story, but that there’s so much of it, and it’s almost entirely gratuitous.

It sort of turns out well, with regard to the movie, at least…except for the part where Hayek’s success was added to the Weinstein luster, and that he then intentionally stunted her career.

Months later, in October 2002, this film, about my hero and inspiration — this Mexican artist who never truly got acknowledged in her time with her limp and her unibrow, this film that Harvey never wanted to do, gave him a box office success that no one could have predicted, and despite his lack of support, added six Academy Award nominations to his collection, including best actress.

Even though “Frida” eventually won him two Oscars, I still didn’t see any joy. He never offered me a starring role in a movie again. The films that I was obliged to do under my original deal with Miramax were all minor supporting roles.

It seems just to me that Weinstein’s reputation as a patron of the arts is going down in flames, along with his reputation as a decent person.

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