Saturday, 16 January

20:00 EST

Robert Cringley Predicted 'The Death of IT' in 2020. Was He Right? [Slashdot]

Yesterday long-time tech pundit Robert Cringley reviewed the predictions he'd made at the beginning of last year. "Having done this for over 20 years, historically I'm correct abut 70 percent of the time, but this year could be a disappointment given that I'm pretty sure I didn't predict 370,000 deaths and an economy in free-fall. "We'll just have to see whether I was vague enough to get a couple right." Here's some of the highlights: I predicted that IBM would dump a big division and essentially remake itself as Red Hat, its Linux company. Well yes and no. IBM did announce a major restructuring, spinning-off Global Technology Services just as I predicted (score one for me) but it has all happened slowly because everything slows down during a pandemic. The resulting company won't be called Red Hat (yet), but the rest of it was correct so I'm going to claim this one, not that anybody cares about IBM anymore... I predicted that working from home would accelerate a trend I identified as the end of IT, by which I meant the kind of business IT provided and maintained by kids from that office in the basement. By working from home, we'd all become our own IT guys and that would lead to acceleration in the transition of certain technologies, especially SD-WAN and Secure Access Service Edge (SASE)... "That's the end-game if there is one — everything in the cloud with your device strictly for input and output, painting screens compressed with HTML5. It's the end of IT because your device will no longer contain anything, so it can be simply replaced via Amazon if it is damaged or lost, with the IT kid in the white shirt becoming an Uber driver (if any of those survive)." It was a no-brainer, really, and I was correct: Internet-connected hardware sales surged, SASE took over whether you even knew it or not, and hardly any working from home was enabled by technology owned by the business, itself. It's key here that the operant term for working from home became "Zooming" — a third-party public brand built solely in the cloud. Finally, I predicted that COVID-19 would accelerate the demise of not just traditional IT, but also IT contractors, because the more things that could be done in the cloud the less people would be required to do them. So what actually happened? Well I was right about the trend but wrong about the extent. IT consulting dropped in 2020 by about 19 percent, from $160 billion to $140 billion. That's a huge impact, but I said "kill" and 19 percent isn't even close to dead. So I was wrong.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

19:00 EST

Online Far-Right Movements Fracture, as 'Gullible' QAnon Supporters Criticized [Slashdot]

"Online far-right movements are splintering," argues NBC News: Users on forums that openly helped coordinate the Jan. 6 riot and called for insurrection...have become increasingly agitated with QAnon supporters, who are largely still in denial that President Donald Trump will no longer be in the Oval Office after Jan. 20... [QAnon adherents] have identified Inauguration Day as a last stand, and falsely think he will force a 10-day, countrywide blackout that ends in the mass execution of his political enemies and a second Trump term... According to researchers who study the real-life effects of the QAnon movement, the false belief in a secret plan for Jan. 20 is irking militant pro-Trump and anti-government groups, who believe the magical thinking is counterproductive to future insurrections... While several specific doomsdays have passed without any prophecies coming true, experts who study QAnon believe another failed prophecy on Inauguration Day could further decimate the movement. Fredrick Brennan, who created the website 8chan where "Q" posts and has spent the last two years attempting to have the site removed from the internet for its ties to white supremacist terror attacks, said he believes reality may devastate the movement on Inauguration Day. "This week has been hugely demoralizing so far and that will be the final straw," he said. "Even though Q is at the moment based on Donald Trump, it is certainly possible for a significant faction to rise up that believes he was in the deep state all along and foiled the plan." The fracture is "apparent on viral TikToks and Facebook posts," reports NBC News, with one TikTok post mocking "the number of the gullible people who are still out there saying Q is going to run to the rescue."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Biden To Quickly Sign Orders Mandating Masks, Reversing Trump Travel Ban And More [News : NPR]

President-elect Joe Biden plans to take a number of policy actions on immigration, climate, pandemic mitigation and other issues in his first days and weeks in office, his chief of staff announced on Saturday.

The actions for Day 1 were laid out in a memo by his chief of staff. The president-elect will extend pauses on student loan payments and evictions, plus send an immigration bill to Congress.

(Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Critical NASA rocket test ends early with a shutdown [The Verge - All Posts]

A critical NASA rocket test ended with a shutdown on Saturday, a little over a minute into what was planned to be an eight-minute test. This trial run was a vital checkpoint for NASA’s much-delayed Space Launch System. The SLS is set to play a key role in the agency’s Artemis program which aims to return astronauts to the Moon.

During today’s Green Run test, the four rocket engines in the SLS core fired for a little over a minute while anchored in NASA’s rocket test stand. The team had planned to have the engines fire for approximately eight minutes, or about the same amount of time it will take to launch future missions to the Moon.

Continue reading…

18:00 EST

Apple Suspended Social Media Platform Wimkin From Its App Store [Slashdot]

Apple "suspended" the social media platform Wimkin from its App Store, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday, "part of a widening crackdown by tech companies on potentially dangerous content during the presidential transition." Long-time Slashdot reader phalse phace shares their report: Mr. Sheppard said the takedowns on the platform, which has 300,000 users and mimics some of the functions of Facebook, pales in comparison to content removals by much larger competitors. "I can't fault them for looking at it," Mr. Sheppard said of Apple. "I just wish they would give us a chance..." Mr. Sheppard said his team is installing additional security measures, including tools that automatically flag keywords such as "murder" and "killing." Apple's App Review Board said in a message to Mr. Sheppard Tuesday that his proposals to limit further harmful content failed to satisfy its rules... Mr. Sheppard said Thursday night that he was in contact with Apple officials on possible ways to meet the tech company's standards and eventually return to the App Store... Representatives of the Google Play app store also sent Mr. Sheppard a warning of potential removal Thursday morning, giving him 24 hours to implement new policies, according to a copy of their correspondence reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. Google didn't respond to requests for comment. The site has just five moderators in total, Sheppard tells the Journal. "We're not out there to fact-check. We're out there to keep people safe

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Luke's hallway scene synced to "I Need a Hero" works surprisingly well [Boing Boing]

Good against remotes is one thing. Good against the living, that's something else.

Xyla Foxlin makes a clear kayak with LED lights [Boing Boing]

I just like watching fiberglass go on. Someday I want to shape and glass my own surfboard.

Man Arrested Near Capitol With Loaded Handgun And 500 Rounds Of Ammunition [News : NPR]

The Capitol seen on Saturday.

Wesley Allen Beeler presented unauthorized inauguration credentials Friday night, police said. Beeler admitted to having the handgun in his pickup truck, according to police.

(Image credit: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

Biden To Quickly Sign Orders Mandating Masks, Reversing Trump Travel Ban And More [News : NPR]

President-elect Joe Biden plans to take a number of policy actions on immigration, climate, pandemic mitigation and other issues in his first days and weeks in office, his chief of staff announced on Saturday.

The actions for Day 1 were laid out in a memo by his chief of staff. The president-elect will extend pauses on student loan payments and evictions, plus send an immigration bill to Congress.

(Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

17:00 EST

Watch NASA Test-Fire Its SLS Mega-Rocket Engines [Slashdot]

"The date is set," NASA tweeted yesterday, thanking its partners Boeing Space and Aerojet Rocketdyne for Saturday's "hot fire" test of the SLS's core stage. "One of NASA's main goals for 2021 is to launch Artemis I, an uncrewed moon mission meant to show the Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket can safely send humans to our lunar neighbor," reports CNET. "But first, NASA plans to make some noise with a fiery SLS test on Saturday." Live coverage of the event begins at 1:20 p.m. PT on NASA TV, reports Digital Trends, noting that NASA is targeting a two-hour window for the actual SLS rocket test starting 40 minutes later at 2 p.m. PT. schwit1 shares this report from Space.com: It's a critical test for NASA and the final step in the agency's "Green Run" series of tests to ensure the SLS rocket is ready for its first launch... In the upcoming hot-fire engine test, engineers will load the Boeing-built SLS core booster with over 700,000 gallons of cryogenic (that's really cold) propellant into the rocket's fuel tanks and light all four of its RS-25 engines at once. The engines will fire for 485 seconds (a little over 8 minutes) and generate a whopping 1.6 million pounds of thrust throughout the test... Following the success of this hot fire test and subsequent uncrewed missions to the moon, "the next key step in returning astronauts to the moon and eventually going on to Mars," Jeff Zotti, the RS-25 program director at Aerojet Rocketdyne said during the news conference. NASA's SLS program manager John Honeycutt agreed. "This powerful rocket is going to put us in a position to be ready to support the agency in the country's deep space mission to the moon and beyond," he said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Anything can be an instrument: The Imperial March on a toaster [Boing Boing]

Watch the whole video to see how Device Orchestra got a toaster, two electric toothbrushes, and a typewriter to play the Imperial March from Star Wars, or just cut right to the 2:04 mark to hear it.

(The Awesomer)

screenshot via Device Orchestra

House Lawmakers Open Investigation Into Capitol Attack [News : NPR]

A memorial for U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, who was killed by rioters in the Jan. 6 attack, is set up near the U.S. Capitol.

They want to know what the intelligence community knew about the planned attack and why officials didn't prepare more thoroughly.

(Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP)

Up To 25,000 Troops Descend On Washington For Biden's Inauguration [News : NPR]

A member of the Virginia National Guard stands outside the razor wire fencing surrounding the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Up to 25,000 troops are expected by Inauguration Day.

The nation prepares for an inauguration unlike any in the country's history amid a massive effort to avoid a repeat of the U.S. Capitol attack.

(Image credit: Liz Lynch/Getty Images)

Facebook suspends ads for weapon accessories until at least January 22nd [The Verge - All Posts]

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Facebook has updated its Inauguration Day preparations to include a temporary ban on ads that promote weapon accessories and protective equipment at least through January 22nd “out of an abundance of caution,” the company said in a new blog post Saturday. “We already prohibit ads for weapons, ammunition and weapon enhancements like silencers. But we will now also prohibit ads for accessories such as gun safes, vests and gun holsters in the US,” the statement reads.

The ban comes after Facebook was criticized for allowing posts across its platforms that promoted and organized the deadly January 6th attack on the Capitol building. The ads for military gear such as body armor and gun holsters ran next to Facebook and Instagram posts about...

Continue reading…

16:00 EST

Thousands of Users Unknowingly Joined Signal Because of a 12-Year-Old's App [Slashdot]

"At least 10,000 Signal users can be attributed to a 12-year-old kid in India who created a somewhat popular clone of the encrypted chat app," reports Motherboard: Dev Sharma, a Signal user from Melbourne, Australia, found the Signal clone when he encountered an unusual thing: Signal displayed a pop-up showing that their friend had just joined the app. Sharma messaged their friend, but the friend had never even heard of Signal, despite apparently using the app. The friend had downloaded a different app called "Calls Chat," according to a tweet from Dev. It turned out, Calls Chat is actually a clone of Signal and lets users communicate with people on the legitimate Signal app. The app may have been harmless in this instance, but its existence and thousands of downloads shows how it can be relatively easy for someone to take the open source code of Signal and repurpose it for their own means, potentially misleading users about what they're actually downloading in the process. "I didn't know I was creating a clone of Signal, in fact I didn't even know such an app existed," Dheeraj, the boy who made the clone, told Motherboard in a phone call... The Google Play Store bars developers from impersonating other apps or making others that are deceptive, however. Google told Motherboard on Wednesday that the chat app is no longer available on the Play Store.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

These 15 deals on flashlights and headlamps are on sale for up to 66% off [Boing Boing]

It probably sounds trite, but a quality light source in an emergency really can make the difference between life and death. While you hope to never need it, a powerful, functioning flashlight or headlamp should not only be part of your pack for any outdoor excursion, it should also be stationed in your vehicle for the day disaster might strike. — Read the rest

15:00 EST

Google Employees Try Baking Recipes Created by AI [Slashdot]

"Behold the cakie: It has the crispiness of a cookie and the, well, 'cakiness' of a cake." So says a triumphant blog post by Google Cloud's developer advocate and an applied AI Engineer for Google's Cloud AI. "We also made breakies, which were more like fluffy cookies, almost the consistency of a muffin" (or bread). Food and Wine explains the project (in an article shared by Slashdot reader John Trumpian): Inspired by the pandemic-spawned spike in searches for baking, the team at Google Cloud "decided to dive a little deeper into the trend and try to understand the science behind what makes cookies crunchy, cake spongy and bread fluffy," according to a post on their blog. Then, once armed with that machine learning knowledge, they attempted to mix these attributes into what they bill as "two completely new baking recipes...." [T]hese Google Cloud employees organized about 700 recipes covering cookies, cakes, and breads — standardizing measurements, isolating the key ingredients, and re-categorizing things like banana breads that aren't really "breads." Then, they fed them into a tool called "AutoML Tables" to create a machine learning model that was able to predict whether a recipe was a cookie, cake, or bread based on its ingredient amounts. ["If you've never tried AutoML Tables, it's a code-free way to build models from the type of data you'd find in a spreadsheet like numbers and categories — no data science background required," explains the blog post.] Of course, recipes don't necessarily fit perfectly into one category. As Sara Robinson, who led the project, explained, a recipe might come back as 97 percent bread, 2 percent cake, and 1 percent cookie. So what if she asked the model to create its own recipe: something that's 50 percent cookie and 50 percent cake? That's how the Cakie was born. And she was happily surprised by the results. "It is yummy," Robinson said. "And it strangely tastes like what I'd imagine would happen if I told a machine to make a cake cookie hybrid." Based on that success, she and colleague Dale Markowitz continued to tweak their model — which resulted in the Breakie. "We should caveat that while our model gave us ingredients, it didn't spit out any baking directions, so we had to improvise those ourselves," the blog post explains. "And, we added chocolate chips and cinnamon for good measure." Robinson also built a prediction-making web app to help quickly experiment with different ingredient ratios. They ultimately identified which ingredients were the biggest "signal" of cake-ness, cookie-ness, and bread-ness, concluding that "In our case, the amount of butter, sugar, yeast and egg in a recipe all seemed to be important indicators..."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Bell's brewery releases beer named after very Midwestern idiom [Boing Boing]

Bell's Brewery in Kalamazoo, Michigan tapped into a very Michigan thing, Michiganders say, to name their newest beer. No, it's not called party store (convenient store), 'jeet? (did you eat?) or doorwall (sliding glass door out to the patio)–all really embarrassing Michigan expressions, that I haven't entirely shaken since moving from Michigan to Chicago more than 20 years ago. — Read the rest

Sea shanties are cool, and so are union work songs [Boing Boing]

Sea shanties (and other sea songs) are all the rage on TikTok right now. The sentiments of these often plaintive songs of hard labor, love, longing, and loss seem to have found a resonance in our collective psyche. — Read the rest

The instinctive genius of Kate Bush's "Wuthering Heights" [Boing Boing]

In this episode of Songs That Changed Music, producer and musician Warren Hewitt breaks down 19-year-old Kate Bush's 1978 single, "Wuthering Heights," and explains what makes it such a breathtaking debut composition.

Image: YouTube

Here are all the ways time is an illusion [Boing Boing]

This explainer on all the ways that humans subjectively experience time is packed with all kinds of interesting factoid about how hard it is for us to accurately gauge time and place time in context. For instance, Marilyn Monroe and Queen Elizabeth were born in the same year, but where Marilyn feels like a young woman from long ago, Queen Elizabeth has always seemed like she was a stately older woman to most people alive today. — Read the rest

Retrofit for contactless touchscreens and buttons [Boing Boing]

Neonode has been around for a while, but they are making a big push for their products in the age of pandemics.

I would want to see a LOT of data on these before I used one of these on an ATM or other input device that requires personal or financial information. — Read the rest

An attempt to master a new garlic-peeling technique [Boing Boing]

Photo of garlic by JMacPherson

Helen Rosner writes a witty post about becoming intrigued by a new garlic-peeling technique that moves at rapid-fire pace, and her attempt to master it.

I won't spoil the … ending. It's a short piece, go read it.

Rosner's description:

 The video shows a pair of hands using the point of a knife to stab each clove from an intact head of garlic and pop it from its skin.

Read the rest

Baked Alaska arrested [Boing Boing]

Tim "Baked Alaska" Gionet, a far-right activist and general Trump-era figure of fun, was arrested today by the FBI over his role in the attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Gionet posted video that showed Trump supporters in "Make America Great Again" and "God Bless Trump" hats milling around and taking selfies with officers in the Capitol who calmly asked them to leave the premises.

Read the rest

For all of your sedition tracking needs [Boing Boing]

Stay abreast of all of that hot sedition tracking and arresting action, thanks to the the Sedition Tracker website and Twitter feed.

Image: SeditionTracker inset

The Best of the Year stop motion animation on Vimeo goes to… [Boing Boing]

Congrats to Cairo maker, Dina Amin. She has been awarded Best of the Year in the stop motion category by Vimeo.

If you don't know Dina's work, she is a product designer who does the coolest stop motion animations featuring products and technology. — Read the rest

The dinosaurs in Pee-wee's Big Adventure have been painted for Valentine's Day [Boing Boing]

The Cabazon Dinosaurs are getting seasonal makeovers. It seems to have started last year when they painted their T-Rex as "Santa Claws." Now, love is in the air. To celebrate Valentine's Day, they've turned Dinny the Brontosaurus, the roadside attraction's original steel-and-concrete dino, hot pink, and placed a heart with the word "LOVE" on its side. — Read the rest

Unprecedented Number Of Troops Descend On Washington, D.C., For Biden's Inauguration [News : NPR]

A member of the Virginia National Guard stands outside the razor wire fencing surrounding the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Up to 25,000 troops are expected by Inauguration Day.

Up to 25,000 National Guard troops are expected to be in place by Wednesday, as the nation prepares for an inauguration unlike any in the country's history.

(Image credit: Liz Lynch/Getty Images)

Statehouses Brace For Potential Violence As Biden's Inauguration Approaches [News : NPR]

A temporary 6-foot-high chain-link fence now surrounds California

In the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, governors are stepping up security and calling in the National Guard in anticipation of potentially violent protests.

(Image credit: Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

14:00 EST

What motivates the motivated reasoning of pro-Trump conspiracists? [Ars Technica]

A white pickup truck is decorated in pro-Trump paraphernalia.

Enlarge / January 7, 2021 - St. Paul, Minn. — Trump supporters gather at the Minnesota Governor's Residence after a "Storm The Capitol" event at the Minnesota State Capitol. (credit: Chad Davis / Flickr)

Motivated reasoning is the idea that our mental processes often cause us to filter the evidence we accept based on whether it's consistent with what we want to believe. During these past few weeks, it has been on display in the United States on a truly grand scale. People are accepting context-free videos shared on social media over investigations performed by election officials. They're rejecting obvious evidence of President Donald Trump's historic unpopularity, while buying in to evidence-free conspiracies involving deceased Latin American dictators.

If the evidence for motivated reasoning is obvious, however, it's a lot harder to figure out what's providing the motivation. It's not simply Republican identity, given that Trump adopted many policies that went against previous Republican orthodoxy. The frequent appearance of Confederate flags confirms some racism is involved, but that doesn't seem to explain it all. There's a long enough list of potential motivations to raise doubts as to whether a single one could possibly suffice.

A recent paper in PNAS, however, provides a single explanation that incorporates a lot of the potential motivations. Called "hegemonic masculinity," it involves a world view that places males from the dominant cultural group as the focus of societal power. And survey data seems to back up the idea.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Superconducting Microprocessors? Turns Out They're Ultra-Efficient [Slashdot]

Long-time Slashdot reader AmiMoJo quotes IEEE Spectrum: Computers use a staggering amount of energy today. According to one recent estimate, data centers alone consume two percent of the world's electricity, a figure that's expected to climb to eight percent by the end of the decade. To buck that trend, though, perhaps the microprocessor, at the center of the computer universe, could be streamlined in entirely new ways. One group of researchers in Japan have taken this idea to the limit, creating a superconducting microprocessor — one with zero electrical resistance. The new device, the first of its kind, is described in a study published last month in the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits ... The price of entry for the niobium-based microprocessor is of course the cryogenics and the energy cost for cooling the system down to superconducting temperatures. "But even when taking this cooling overhead into account," says Christopher Ayala, an Associate Professor at the Institute of Advanced Sciences at Yokohama National University, in Japan, who helped develop the new microprocessor, "The AQFP is still about 80 times more energy-efficient when compared to the state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic device, [such as] 7-nm FinFET, available today."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Industrious lets you use a fully-furnished modern office — and only pay on the days you need it [Boing Boing]

It's an option virtually every small business and freelancing professional will eventually consider — do I need to rent office space? Whether it's the result of a growing staff, growing responsibilities, or simply maturing as a company, there's usually a moment for any professional organization when getting a centralized office starts to make a lot of sense. — Read the rest

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