Thursday, 23 February

07:00 EST

Samsung’s Galaxy S8 will reportedly go on sale April 21st [The Verge - All Posts]

We’ve had quite a few leaks regarding Samsung’s next flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S8, and now we’ve got our first sniff of a launch date. According to a report from ET News that cites a “high-ranking official for a mobile network provider,” Samsung will put the S8 on sale worldwide on April 21st. This will reportedly follow an unveiling of the phone in New York on March 29th — a date we’ve already seen reported by other sources.

If the leaks are to be believed we’ll see two new Galaxies in March — the S8 and S8+. The former is reported to have a 5.7-inch display, while the latter has a monstrous 6.2-inch screen. We’re also expecting a top-of-the-line Snapdragon 835 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 12-megapixel rear-facing camera in each...

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06:00 EST

RoadRacer Bike Fenders [Cool Tools]

I believe RoadRacer fenders from Crud Products are the best road bike fenders there are.

Fenders are common on other types of bikes, especially commuters and cruisers. But for some reason, they haven’t caught on with road bikes yet. So it bears discussing why most road bikes should have them.

Advantages of fenders on road bikes:

– Unless you live in the Mohave Desert, you will encounter rain sometimes. Everywhere else, fenders mean you can ride more often. Also, unlike jackets, fenders stay on the bike, and will help you cope with even unexpected showers.

– They keep water off you. Nobody likes a stripe of water sprayed up your tuchus. But the front wheel also can throw water on your feet and legs.

– They keep water off your bike. Actually, I believe the FRONT wheel is more critical here than the back. Without a front fender, the front wheel will kick up road water (which is full of dirt and grit, unlike rainwater) and throw it on your bottom bracket, crankset and chain, and thence to your rear derailleur and cogset. They don’t like that.

Disadvantages:

– They add a bit of weight. But I use my road bike for commuting. It is faster and more fun than city bikes or commuters. Also, it is the only bike I have right now. So it is loaded with a rack, lights, saddlebag with a flat kit, and a lock. So it isn’t going to break any weight records, and the weight of fenders won’t make much difference. It will still be lighter than most city bikes.

– Some buses or trains have bike carriers that hold onto the bike with a hook that presses down on the top of the tire. A fender might get damaged or keep the hook from working correctly.

– Some fenders can be difficult to mount, especially if the forks and stays wrap tightly around the tire.

– Depending on your bike’s geometry, a sharp turn can swing the front wheel out so it contacts your outside foot as you pedal. If you have a front fender, that can pull it out of position. But you can avoid that issue easily by being just conscious of where your pedals are when you are turning (Hard to explain, easy to do).

– If you have to take wheels off for transportation, say when you want to throw the bike in your car trunk, the fenders will be unprotected and easy to damage.

Advantages of this particular RoadRacer fender set:

– It offers a lot of coverage, about 50% of the wheel circle. With all extensions installed, the tail of the front fender is just a few inches off the ground.

– Being made entirely of plastic (including the screws and mounting hardware), they are very light, just 260 grams. Compare that to Planet Bike’s system at 465 grams, and the SKS set at 689 grams. – The all-plastic construction is designed to break if it hits any part of the bike, like the spokes. So if you somehow jam part of the fenders into a moving part, nothing dramatic happens (you don’t fly over the handlebars.) Some of the Amazon reviews complain about their flimsy construction, but I consider that a safety feature.

– It uses unique system of brush-like pads to prevent rubbing. The pads stick to the inside of the fenders, and have numerous fine, long fibers that actually touch the wheel and “float” the fender away from the wheel. They do add a truly minuscule amount of friction, almost unmeasurable. It works great. It also makes installation easier, because it doesn’t have to be adjusted with the micrometer precision of some other systems.

– The system is quite modular. The front fender itself consists of three or four pieces (depending on how long you want it.) If a piece breaks, you can replace it separately. All the pieces may be purchased separately.

– It has a graceful, swoopy but not extravagant design that I personally like.

Disadvantages:

– They use nylon nuts and bolts to connect certain parts. They are very light, but prone to shaking loose. But you can prevent that with a drop of threadlock, or by just flattening the end of the bolt with pliers, so it goes out of round. The nut can still be removed. The nuts and bolts can be replaced at any hardware store, incidentally.

– They are made in Great Britain, so replacement parts can be slow to arrive.

Purchasing notes: The link below is to the Mk II version, with long “stays” (note the graceful curves.) A Mk III version is just out, which is compatible with disk brakes and tires as wide as 35mm. They attach to the fork and stays higher up, away from the hubs.

-- Karl Chwe

CRUD RoadRacer MK2 Road Fenders ($47)

International Amazon link

Available from Amazon

Scientists Discover a Way To Get Every Last Drop of Ketchup Out of the Bottle [Slashdot]

Slashdot reader schwit1 quotes a report from BBC: Scientists in Boston have found a way to get every last drop of ketchup out of the bottle. They have developed a coating that makes bottle interiors super slippery. The coating can also be used to make it easier to squeeze out the contents of other containers, such as those holding toothpaste, cosmetics and even glue. The researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) believe that their innovation could dramatically reduce waste. In its manufacture, the container must first be coated on the inside with a rough surface. A very thin layer is then placed over this. And, finally, a liquid is added that fills in any troughs to form a very slippery surface -- like an oily floor. The ketchup hovers on top and just glides out of the bottle. According to Prof Kripa Varanasi, who developed the slippery surface, the technology is completely safe. "The cool thing about it is that because the coating is a composite of solid and liquid, it can be tailored to the product. So for food, we make the coating out of food-based materials and so you can actually eat it." schwit1 adds: "Pretty slick."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Trump's Election Drives More Women To Consider Running For Office [News : NPR]

Kate Noble speaks to voters at a listening session at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She ran for a seat on the Santa Fe Public Schools Board.

One group that helps train female candidates says applications for its programs are up 87 percent since Election Day.

(Image credit: Megan Kamerick/KUNM)

Trump's Plan To Hire 15,000 Border Patrol And ICE Agents Won't Be Easy [News : NPR]

A U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agent passes along a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas.

Applicants have to go through "extreme vetting" including a grueling polygraph exam. In the past, Customs and Border Protection has had trouble retaining agents.

(Image credit: Eric Gay/AP)

Russia launches website dedicated to flagging ‘fake news’ [The Verge - All Posts]

The Russian foreign ministry this week announced a new part of its website dedicated to flagging media reports that it considers to be “fake news,” in a bid to counter accusations that the Kremlin has been spreading its own disinformation online to meddle with politics in the US and Europe.

The web page, unveiled Wednesday, includes links to five English-language news stories about Russia, including articles from Bloomberg, NBC, and The New York Times. The site includes screenshots of the articles with a red “FAKE” stamp on each one. A caption under each screenshot simply claims that the article in question “does not correspond to reality,” without providing any further evidence.

“We will...

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05:00 EST

Judge: No, feds can’t nab all Apple devices and try everyone’s fingerprints [Ars Technica]

Enlarge (credit: GLENN CHAPMAN/AFP/Getty Images)

A federal magistrate judge in Chicago recently denied the government’s attempt to force people in a particular building to depress their fingerprints in an attempt to open any seized Apple devices as part of a child pornography investigation.

This prosecution, nearly all of which remains sealed, is one of a small but growing number of criminal cases that pit modern smartphone encryption against both the Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable search and seizure, and also the Fifth Amendment right to avoid self-incrimination. According to the judge’s opinion, quoting from a still-sealed government filing, "forced fingerprinting" is part of a broader government strategy, likely to combat the prevalence of encrypted devices.

Last year, federal investigators sought a similar permission to force residents of two houses in Southern California to fingerprint-unlock a seized phone in a case that also remains sealed. In those cases, and likely in the Illinois case as well, the prosecutors' legal analysis states that there is no Fifth Amendment implication at play. Under the Constitution, defendants cannot be compelled to provide self-incriminating testimony (“what you know”). However, traditionally, giving a fingerprint (“what you are”) for the purposes of identification or matching to an unknown fingerprint found at a crime scene has been allowed. It wasn’t until relatively recently, however, that fingerprints could be used to unlock a smartphone.

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Sen. McCain Makes Unannounced Trip To Syria To Meet With U.S. Forces [News : NPR]

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks during the Munich Security Conference last week. McCain

John McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, went to Syria last week to discuss the campaign for defeating militants from the Islamic State.

(Image credit: Matthias Schrader/AP)

What's Next For The Affordable Care Act? Your Questions Answered [News : NPR]

The one thing that

A lot of people are confused about when and if Republicans can "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act. Kaiser Health News' Julie Rovner clears things up in the first of a series.

(Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Preserving The Flavor Of An Atlanta Neighborhood [News : NPR]

Keitra Bates stands in front of the building she plans to turn into Marddy

Entrepreneur Keitra Bates is opening a shared commercial kitchen to help keep culinary traditions alive on the city's gentrifying west side.

(Image credit: Debbie Elliot/NPR)

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons [News : NPR]

Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union

A "March for Science" is set for April 22 in Washington, D.C., to show support for evidence-based public policy. But some worry the march will be seen as partisan, and may even undermine sound policy.

(Image credit: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)

Cressida Dick Named Scotland Yard's First Female Top Cop [News : NPR]

Cressida Dick, who worked for Scotland Yard for 31 years before leaving to work for Britain

Cressida Dick, 56, a former beat cop in London's West End, on Wednesday was named the first female police commissioner in the organization's 188-year history.

(Image credit: Charlotte Ball/AP)

Uber tells users deleting their accounts that it’s “deeply hurting” after sexism allegations [The Verge - All Posts]

Testimony from a former Uber employee that the company has ignored systemic problems of sexual harassment and workplace discrimination continue to reverberate. The latest reaction from Uber is to try to reassure users who are deleting their accounts in protest that the Silicon Valley firm is responding to these problems.

As reported by Mashable, a number of Uber users in the process of deleting their accounts have been shown a message saying the company is “deeply hurting” after reading allegations by former employee Susan Fowler. The statement, which does not apologize or accept responsibility for the toxic culture brought to light by Fowler and others, says Uber “believes in creating a workplace where a deep sense of justice underpins...

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Apple criticizes Trump’s reversal of transgender rights in public schools [The Verge - All Posts]

Apple has criticized President Donald Trump’s decision to roll back protections for transgender students in public schools, aligning itself with protestors and civil rights advocates who say the move will open the door for broader discrimination.

"Apple believes everyone deserves a chance to thrive in an environment free from stigma and discrimination," Apple said in a statement to Axios late Wednesday. "We support efforts toward greater acceptance, not less, and we strongly believe that transgender students should be treated as equals. We disagree with any effort to limit or rescind their rights and protections."

The guidelines, issued last year by the...

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Three recommendations to enable Annotations on the Web [W3C News]

The Web Annotation Working Group has just published a Recommendation for Web Annotation in the form three documents:

  • Web Annotation Data Model—specification describes a structured model and format, in JSON, to enable annotations to be shared and reused across different hardware and software platforms. Common use cases can be modeled in a manner that is simple and convenient, while at the same time enabling more complex requirements, including linking arbitrary content to a particular data point or to segments of timed multimedia resources.
  • Web Annotation Vocabulary—specifies the set of RDF classes, predicates and named entities that are used by the Web Annotation Data Model. It also lists recommended terms from other ontologies that are used in the model, and provides the JSON-LD Context and profile definitions needed to use the Web Annotation JSON serialization in a Linked Data context.
  • Web Annotation Protocol—describes the transport mechanisms for creating and managing annotations in a method that is consistent with the Web Architecture and REST best practices.

The group has also produced two additional Working Group Notes:

  • Embedding Web Annotations in HTML—describes and illustrates potential approaches for including annotations within HTML documents. Examples also are included illustrating the use within an HTML document of annotation Selectors as fragment identifiers.
  • Selectors and States—selecting part of a resource on the Web is an ubiquitous action. This document does not define any new approach to selection; instead, it relies on the formal specification and the semantics in the Web Annotation Data Model. The current document only “extracts” Selectors and States from that data model; by doing so, it makes their usage easier for applications developers whose concerns are not related to annotations.

04:00 EST

Music Video: Jenny O., 'Cheer Up Free Your Mind' (Back her next album!) [Boing Boing]

Enjoy the wonderful new music video from the recording artist Jenny O., co-directed by Jenny O. with Mariana Blanco.

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Tibetan free library opens doors to readers in India, with help from Boing Boing readers [Boing Boing]

Editor's note: Here's an inspiring update on a cool project some friends of ours are doing in India. About a year ago, Boing Boing readers began contributing to help the Tibetan exile community in Mundgod, India build the region's first free Tibetan public library, with the support of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Shiwatso Library is now open for reading! “We have visitors checking out books from the Library and also coming to read,” says Phuntsok Dorjee, who is one of the organizers, and was raised in one of the refugee settlements there.

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03:00 EST

NASA Scientists Propose New Definition of Planets, and Pluto Could Soon Be Back [Slashdot]

Rei writes: After several years of publicly complaining about the "bullshit" decision at the IAU redefining what comprises a planet, New Horizons program head Alan Stern and fellow planetary geologists have put forth a new definition which they seek to make official, basing planethood on hydrostatic equilibrium. Under this definition, in addition to Ceres, Pluto and other Kuiper Belt objects, large moons like Titan and Europa, as well as our own moon, would also become planets; "planet" would be a physical term, while "moon" would be an orbital term, and hence one can have a planetary moon, as well as planets that orbit other stars or no star at all (both prohibited under the current definition). The paper points out that planetary geologists already refer to such bodies as planets, citing examples such as a paper about Titan: "A planet-wide detached haze layer occurs between 300-350 km above the surface; the visible limb of the planet, where the vertical haze optical depth is 0.1, is about 220 km above the surface."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Watch the four-minute prologue for Alien: Covenant [The Verge - All Posts]

Has enough time passed since the disappointing Prometheus for us to be excited about a new Alien movie again? That’s questionable, but this new clip of Alien: Covenant suggests that the movie is making the welcome decision to lean on the 1979 horror/sci-fi classic for inspiration. Titled “The Last Supper,” the four-minute video serves as a prologue to the events of the movie, introducing the colonist characters who have joined the Covenant mission to find a new world.

The Last Supper in question appears to be a nod to the iconic dinner scene in the original Alien. Just like that scene, jovial proceedings on board the ship give way to panic when one guest has some digestive distress, but Alien: Covenant doesn’t give the game away that...

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02:00 EST

'Demonic activity was palpable' at Trump rally, says Florida pastor [Boing Boing]

A Florida pastor who took his 11 year old daughter to see a Donald Trump campaign-style presidential rally said he'd hoped his kid would learn something, but instead witnessed that “demonic activity was palpable.”

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Angry Constituents Are Saving America From Trump And We Are Here For It [Boing Boing]

Person of the Year so far in 2017? The Angry Constituent.

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Wednesday, 22 February

23:00 EST

Judge Blocks California Law Limiting Publication of Actor's Ages [Slashdot]

mi writes: IMDb has a reason to rejoice. Politico reports: "A federal judge has barred the State of California from enforcing a new law limiting online publication of actors' ages. Acting in a case brought by online movie information website IMDb, U.S. District Court Judge Vince Chhabria ruled Wednesday that the California law likely violates the First Amendment and appears poorly tailored to proponents' stated goal of preventing age discrimination in Hollywood. The judge expressed deep skepticism that the law, which he said appeared to apply only to IMDb, would have any effect on discrimination. The judge rejected the state's arguments that the law was a regulation of commercial speech, finding that IMDb was acting as a publisher in posting the birthday and age information online." "It's not clear how preventing one mere website from publishing age information could meaningfully combat discrimination at all. And even if restricting publication on this one website could confer some marginal anti-discrimination benefit, there are likely more direct, more effective, and less speech-restrictive ways of achieving the same end," Chhabria wrote in a three-page order.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Lawsuit Accuses Milwaukee Police Of Abusive Stop And Frisk Practices [News : NPR]

The plaintiffs say random stops are up, and unfairly focus on blacks and Latinos. The police chief says his force doesn't have a practice of stop and frisk, and citizen complaints are down.

22:00 EST

Here’s Arianna Huffington’s memo to Uber employees about the investigation she’s helping lead [The Verge - All Posts]

Uber is still reeling after the explosive allegations of sexual harassment and a toxic work culture that surfaced over the weekend. The company and its CEO Travis Kalanick are simultaneously in damage control and investigation modes, holding an emotional all-hands meeting and putting together a group to review the problems at Uber, led by former US Attorney General Eric Holder and board member Arianna Huffington.

If that wasn’t enough, The New York Times tonight published yet more evidence of problems at Uber, detailing harassment at a debauched Las Vegas party and a manager who “threatened to beat an underperforming employee’s head in with a baseball bat.”

In an email that was sent to Uber employees and obtained by The Verge,...

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21:00 EST

After sexual harassment account, Uber exposé shows aggressive, unrestrained work culture [Boing Boing]

After a former Uber engineer detailed her account of sexual harassment while working there for about a year, New York Times reporter Mike Isaac dug into the story and got the goods. His exposé describes an amoral Ayn Randian meritocracy filled with aggressive jerks, in which one could absolutely imagine impunity for sexual harassment being an accepted norm.

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Climate change: Apocalypse by 1000 cuts [Boing Boing]

Not since the Reagan era cold war with Russia has apocalyptic awareness been so forefront in the public’s mind. Disturbing incidents ranging from nuclear football Facebook selfies to alarming North Korean military activity now accrue weekly. Sometimes hourly. What can one do besides scroll through Twitter before bedtime and let the news populate our nightmares?

The distractions and details are addictive: political murders via improv and a spray bottle, daily revelations of Russian infiltration in US elections and government, and today the president is yelling at Sweden. Tomorrow it might be Ireland. Who knows. We watch the global breakup like helpless children realizing that mom and dad are really getting a divorce. Right now, the sitting US president is not even welcome in the British Parliament, but he regularly tweets flattering sentiments to Russia. But there is a larger story that needs telling--and action.

Lost in the noise was the recent breakage of a mile-long stretch of West Antarctica, due to warmer ocean water. It was part of one of the largest glaciers within the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which scientists predict will collapse in the next 100 years. NASA caught the images of the event earlier in the week, but the story broke just as Scott Pruitt was confirmed as head of the Environmental Protection Agency--making it seem as if the Earth did the planetary version of a spit take at the news. Timing aside, it was a big deal.

In the distraction of every new development, tweet, or outrage, it’s hard to get a bird’s eye view of what the hell is going on in the literal world. Luckily, Laurie Penny of The Baffler has done that for us, in a brilliant new article that should be required reading for the human race: The Slow Confiscation of Everything: How to think about climate apocalypse. Referencing the daily outrages, legislative battles, and civil division, she writes:

“Racist laws can eventually be overthrown, and even a cultural backslide toward bigotry and nationalism can be slowly, painfully reversed. We don’t get a do-over on climate change. The vested interests agitating to strip the planet for parts know that, too—and they plan to profit from this particular apocalypse as hard as they can.”

In the piece, she eloquently demonstrates that it is no longer the failure of diplomatic relations that is likely to kill us. It’s the man-made weapon that’s already been unleashed in global warming. That missile has already been launched. The point becomes clear: climate change is no longer an environmental issue. It’s a human rights issue--the right to live, and the right to have our children’s children live, too. It is not liberal alarmist drama. It's about life as we know it, and we need to adjust accordingly, or we will soon not recognize it at all.

“Climate change is species collapse by a thousand cuts. There will be no definite moment we can say that yes, today we are fucked, and yesterday we were unfucked. Instead the fuckery increases incrementally year on year, until this is the way the world ends: not with a bang, not with a bonfire, but with the slow and savage confiscation of every little thing that made you human, starting with hope.”

Echoing the storyline of her outstanding dystopian novel, Everything Belongs to the Future, she outlines where we are, how we got here, and shows us the (decreasing) options before us. Importantly, government policy choices are part of what determines which path the human race is really on. The voice of the people and their ability to understand this fatally overlooked reality--and then do something about it, is the ray of hope here. But it’s an attitude adjustment that needs to happen soon. We’re looking at incremental, but preventable, human extinction. We’re all drafted for this war, and really, we’re all ultimately on the same side. The challenge is, can we stop the bleeding in time?

“It is hard to outline the contours of a future you have never been allowed to imagine—one that is both different from today but accessible from it, too. The best we have been permitted to hope for is that the status quo be scraped to the edges of the present for as long as it lasts—a vote to run the knife around the empty jar of neoliberal aspiration and hope there’s enough to cover our asses. If people cannot imagine a future for themselves, all they can measure is what they’ve lost. Those who believe in the future are left, as they always were, with the responsibility of creating it, and that begins with an act of faith—not just that the future will be survivable, but that it might, somehow, maybe, be an exciting place to live.”

'No More Trouble', Bob Marley and the Wailers live on the BBC, 1973 [Boing Boing]

Bob Marley and the Wailers, 1973. The full live set is below, recorded in-studio for the BBC.

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JOHN WILCOCK: Meeting Edie Sedgwick [Boing Boing]


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAuI97l3BcY&w=560&h=315]

A book of John Wilcock comics is now available

Paralyzed Man Uses Brain Implant To Type Eight Words Per Minute [Slashdot]

A study published in the journal eLife describes three participants that broke new ground in the use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) by people with paralysis. One of the participants, a 64-year-old man paralyzed by a spinal cord injury, "set a new record for speed in a 'copy typing' task," reports IEEE Spectrum. "Copying sentences like 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog,' he typed at a relatively blistering rate of eight words per minute." From the report: This experimental gear is far from being ready for clinical use: To send data from their implanted brain chips, the participants wear head-mounted components with wires that connect to the computer. But Henderson's team, part of the multiuniversity BrainGate consortium, is contributing to the development of devices that can be used by people in their everyday lives, not just in the lab. "All our research is based on helping people with disabilities," Henderson tells IEEE Spectrum. Here's how the system works: The tiny implant, about the size of a baby aspirin, is inserted into the motor cortex, the part of the brain responsible for voluntary movement. The implant's array of electrodes record electrical signals from neurons that "fire" as the person thinks of making a motion like moving their right hand -- even if they're paralyzed and can't actually move it. The BrainGate decoding software interprets the signal and converts it into a command for the computer cursor. Interestingly, the system worked best when the researchers customized it for each participant. To train the decoder, each person would imagine a series of different movements (like moving their whole right arm or wiggling their left thumb) while the researchers looked at the data coming from the electrodes and tried to find the most obvious and reliable signal. Each participant ended up imagining a different movement to control the cursor. The woman with ALS imagined moving her index finger and thumb to control the cursor's left-right and up-down motions. Henderson says that after a while, she didn't have to think about moving the two digits independently. "When she became facile with this, she said it wasn't anything conscious; she felt like she was controlling a joystick," he says. The man with the spinal cord injury imagined moving his whole arm as if he were sliding a puck across a table. "Each participant settled on control modality that worked best," Henderson says. You can watch a video about the study here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

20:00 EST

10-year-old asks police department for help – with homework – and gets it [Boing Boing]

Ten-year-old Lena Draper, from Marion, OH, was stumped with her math homework and needed help. And who do you go to when in need? The police of course!

The fifth grader jumped on Facebook and went straight to the Marion police department. “I’m having trouble with my homework. Could you help me?” Here was the problem: (8+29) x 15.

Lt. B.J. Gruber, age 42, came to the rescue. "Do the numbers in parenthesis first."

Lena didn't stop there, and asked him to help her with a second problem: (90+27) + (29+15) x 2.

The patient officer did his best to help her again. "Take the answer from the first parenthesis plus the answer from the second parenthesis and multiply that answer times two. Work left to right doing the work inside [the] parenthesis first."

But, having been a few decades since he last sat in math class, the officer was a little rusty with the order of things. When Lena's mom posted the Facebook exchange, she found out from a friend that the second answer was wrong – the order of operation was, well, out of order. Gruber admits his best subject was always history, not math.

See the full story here.

Trump rolls back Obama-era protections for transgender students [Boing Boing]

Sham president Donald Trump's sham government on Wednesday rolled back federal protections for transgender students who don't want to be harassed, sexually assaulted, or physically attacked when they go to a public school bathroom that matches their gender identity, instead of the conflicting gender definition others try to force upon them.

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Tesla posts a Q4 loss but the company’s revenue grows amid acquisitions [Ars Technica]

Enlarge / This is what every Tesla driver wants to see upon arrival at a Supercharger station. (credit: Tesla)

On Wednesday, Tesla posted a Q4 2016 loss of $121.3 million, but the loss was narrower than the $320 million net loss from the year earlier. The company said it made $2.28 billion in revenue in the quarter, up from $1.24 billion in Q4 the year before. Tesla reported $7 billion in annual gross revenue in 2016.

All that comes on the heels of a Q3 in which the company posted a rare profitable quarter that CEO Elon Musk called Tesla’s “best quarter ever.”

The company said its gross margin fell between the third and fourth quarters of 2016 due to lower Zero Emissions Vehicle credit sales in Q4 compared to the quarter before. In the last three months of the year, Tesla completed its acquisition of SolarCity as well as Grohmann Engineering, which will become Tesla Advanced Automation Germany.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Your Coffee and Tea Deserve Fellow's Drinkware [Lifehacker]

Fellow made a name for themselves by making the only good-looking pour over kettle ever, but they’re not stopping there.

Read more...

Why Flight Attendants Ask You to Raise Your Window Shade During Take-Off and Landing [Lifehacker]

Some airlines have their flight attendants ask you and your fellow passengers to raise your window shades during take-off and landing. This isn’t about waking passengers up at the end of a red-eye or having all the shades up or down for the next flight, it’s about safety.

Read more...

Remains of the Day: Second Windows 10 Update Coming Later This Year [Lifehacker]

Microsoft has been steadily releasing beta previews of their upcoming Creators Update for Windows 10 which is scheduled to arrive this spring, but they’ve just confirmed that there is indeed another significant update planned for later this year. That and more in today’s news.

Read more...

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