Thursday, 23 November

15:00 EST

Why Do Left-Handers Excel at Certain Elite Sports But Not Others? [Slashdot]

Nicola Davis, writing for The Guardian: From cricketer Wasim Akram to baseball pitcher Clayton Kershaw and table tennis star Ding Ning, the world of sport has no shortage of left-handed players. But now researchers say they've worked out why lefties are overrepresented in some elite sports but not others. The study, published in the journal Biology Letters, suggests that being left-handed is a particular advantage in interactive sports where time pressures are particularly severe, such as table tennis and cricket -- possibly because their moves are less familiar to their mostly right-handed opponents, who do not have time to adjust. "The data suggests that the heavier the time constraints are operating in a sport, the larger the proportion of left-handers," said the study's author, Dr Florian Loffing of the University of Oldenburg in Germany. "We are less used to playing lefties, and [so] might end up in not developing the optimal strategies to compete with them." While it is thought that about 10-13 percent of the population is left-handed, it has long been noted that in certain interactive sports there is often a surprisingly high proportion of left-handers playing at elite levels.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Thanksgiving, 1993: The Admiral Theater [Boing Boing]

To the best of my recollection, this was Thanksgiving 1993.

I was 21 and living in Chicago. I'd moved there a few months earlier, under the promise of a job at the Second City, a famed comedy club, that evaporated before I'd ever set foot in the door. Being young and refusing to give up, I stayed for the adventure. My apartment was incredibly cheap, and I was performing a lot more than I had been in LA. I thought I'd make this my new home.

My two roommates had left town to visit family. Greg, a fellow improvisational comedian who'd suffered the same retracted job offer as I, was off to Massachusetts. Marko, a 6'6" pre-frontally lobotomized hoarder who suffered from homophobia, anti-semitism, and only experienced joy while performing as a children's party clown, was someplace I did not care.

My friend Kevin came into town from Los Angeles, we didn't even think about dinner. Mostly, we liked to drink. We were 21 and it was cold.

It was Thursday, everything was closed and we were hungry. We realized it was Thanksgiving. I am absolutely certain this very-good-idea-were-we-not-broke-as-fuck was Kevin's and not mine: we would go to the Chicago Ritz-Carlton and join their Thanksgiving dinner.

We decided that appearances would matter and that we should look nice if we intended to have dinner with rich and fancy people at a rich and fancy place. We put on our very nicest clothes. We still looked like shit.

Moments after arriving at the Ritz, while I marveled at the lovely reception area, Kevin asked the Concierge for directions to the Thanksgiving Dinner. There is no finer magician than a five-star hotel's Concierge. He had a better idea! If we'd give him just a moment the hotel limousine would deliver us to a theater for dinner and a show! The tickets were going to go to waste, he'd feel great if we used them!

The driver was super friendly and happy to give us a ride as well. People at the Ritz-Carlton were very cool. We couldn't believe our good fortune and hopped in the black stretch. We were bound for a theater neither of us had heard of, about 15 minutes away, called The Admiral.

Not all theaters have the same sort of show. Once, when serving as the COO of an advertising start-up, one of my finance folk brought an expense to my attention. I needed to see a large charge on a salesperson's company card attributed to the "O'Farrell Theater" in San Francisco. Due to my Thanksgiving experience at The Admiral Theater, I knew immediately why this accountant was concerned. Salespeople shouldn't expense strip clubs.

After presenting our tickets, and clearing a brief weapons check, we entered a room full of smoke, enlisted Navy guys, strippers and a full Thanksgiving buffet dinner. We each had two complimentary drink tickets. Tips were not included.

The turkey was like cardboard. The gravy, stuffing and mashed potatoes were as one. The cranberry sauce was strangely made from fresh whole cranberries, and the headlining dancer was billed as "Sacajawea the Apache Princess of Fire."

I knew this was culturally inappropriate long before I thought of things as culturally inappropriate. It was just wrong. I was mildly horrified. It was free dinner. I was 21.

Sacajawea ate fire and juggled fire with her boobs out. We ate cardboard turkey. The Navy guys were thrilled. I paid the $20 for a Polaroid with Sacajawea. I regret having lost it.

We did not finish our two drinks. The night ended at the Old Town Ale House. Every night in Chicago should.

Human Brains Have Evolved Unique 'Feel-Good' Circuits [News : NPR]

A chimpanzee skull, at left, and a human skull. Scientists are probing why our brains evolved so differently despite many similarities.

A comparison of brain tissue from monkeys, chimps and humans suggests that our brains produce the chemical messenger dopamine, which plays a major role in pleasure and rewards, far differently.

(Image credit: D. Roberts/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra)

Who Is Zimbabwe's New Leader, Emmerson Mnangagwa? [News : NPR]

A supporter of Zimbabwe

After Robert Mugabe resigned, Emmerson Mnangagwa returned to his country Thursday and asked "all genuine patriotic Zimbabweans to come together."

(Image credit: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP)

14:00 EST

Uber Hackers May Have Been Russian [Slashdot]

Mark Bridge, reporting for The Times: Thousands of Uber customers are believed to have had their accounts hacked by Russians after users of the app (Editor's note: the link is paywalled; alternative source) reported being billed in roubles for taxi journeys they had not taken in Moscow and St Petersburg. More than 800 people in Britain and the United States have complained on Twitter that their accounts were taken over in the past year, The Times found, with the number of reports spiking in April and May. Experts said this number of Twitter reports suggested that the true figure would be much higher.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Justin Trudeau Is 'Very Concerned' With FCC's Plan to Roll Back Net Neutrality [Slashdot]

Justin Ling, reporting for Motherboard: Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says President Donald Trump's plan to roll back net neutrality protections for the internet "does not make sense" and that he'll be looking into what he can do to defend net neutrality for the whole internet. "I am very concerned about the attacks on net neutrality," Trudeau said in Toronto, in response to a question from Motherboard about Trump's plans. "Net neutrality is something that is essential for small businesses, for consumers, and it is essential to keep the freedom associated with the internet alive." Motherboard asked specifically what Trudeau planned to do in response to the plan put forward on Tuesday by the Federal Communications Commission, which could pave the way for tiered internet service and pay-for-play premium access to internet consumers. "We need to continue to defend net neutrality," Trudeau added. "And I will."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

This literal gravy train is here to ruin Thanksgiving [The Verge - All Posts]

Gravy is a magical thing. It can rescue even the most bland holiday meals. But too much of anything can be a bad thing, even gravy — especially when it’s being blasted from the tiny cannon of a toy boat strapped to a plastic train.

That mad lib sentence will make more sense when you watch the above video. In it, intrepid YouTuber and sauce delivery pioneer William Osman gives in to the apparent demands of his viewers and tries to make a literal gravy train.

A few grocery store and drilling montages later, he has something that is kind of in the same ballpark as the gravy train from Coraline. His version, which uses a toy boat instead of a gravy boat, clearly has more kinks to be worked out. But the resulting mess is fun, and it’s a...

Continue reading…

13:00 EST

Thanksgiving Idea: Give government back to the Native Americans? [Philip Greenspun's Weblog]

I’m thankful for a lot of things this year, but I don’t want to disfigure this blog too much with the maudlin friends-and-family sentiments that are more conventional on Facebook.

Let me try something in the old-style Thanksgiving spirit and just say thank-you to the Native Americans for not insisting that all of the Europeans who landed here return back home. Without Native American hospitality I wouldn’t have been able to enjoy the use of this great continent for 54 years.

However, I wonder if we European-Americans haven’t overstayed our welcome. I haven’t kept in touch with the Native American friends whom I made while living in New Mexico, but I can’t imagine that they looked at the 2016 Presidential election and said “It is amazing that these European immigrants managed to find two such fantastic candidates.”

Maybe we can’t all clear out and leave North America to its rightful inhabitants (unless we start to do better on the PISA test, other countries probably wouldn’t want us), but could we at least clear out politically? Why not let the Native Americans set up a government (presumably they’d pick a British-style parliamentary system, as have most countries) and we non-Native Americans can agree to respect their decisions?

Related:

Judge who once ruled against NSA metadata program tosses lawsuit [Ars Technica]

Enlarge / Larry Klayman, seen here in 2014. (credit: The Washington Post / Contributor)

A federal judge in Washington, DC has dismissed two long-running lawsuits that aimed to shed light on the often secretive surveillance state. As the National Security Agency’s metadata program no longer exists, the cases are now moot.

"This Court, in the final analysis, has no choice but to dismiss these cases for plaintiffs’ failure to demonstrate the necessary jurisdiction to proceed," US District Judge Richard Leon wrote on November 21. "I do so today, however, well aware that I will not be the last District Judge who will be required to determine the appropriate balance between our national security and privacy interests during this never-ending war on terror."

The original version of this case, known as Klayman v. Obama, was filed by well-known conservative activist attorney Larry Klayman on June 7, 2013—the day after the Snowden revelations became public. The complaint argued that the National Security Agency’s telephone metadata program ("Section 215"), which gathered records of all incoming and outgoing calls for years on end, was unconstitutional.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Guidemaster: Want an Alexa device? Here’s every Amazon Echo, compared [Ars Technica]

Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino)

Amazon debuted the original Echo a few years ago, and it raised eyebrows in the tech industry. The Echo is a smart home speaker that houses Amazon's Alexa virtual assistant, an AI helper that helps you complete daily tasks using only your voice. Since its debut, users of all levels of tech prowess have embraced Echo and Alexa, finding practicality in a voice-controlled assistant and all the things it can do.

Both Alexa and the Echo have evolved since then to meet the needs of an ever-growing market. After the Echo and Alexa came Google Home with the Google Assistant, the Harman Kardon Invoke with Microsoft's Cortana, and the forthcoming Homepod with Apple's Siri. Amazon has an advantage over all these competitors because it has had the time to develop many different Echo devices and expand Alexa to be a multifaceted assistant, thanks to third-party integrations and skills. ("Skills" is Amazon's word for apps, in this case.)

Plenty of smart home device manufacturers have integrated Alexa into their products, and Alexa now has more than 25,000 skills made by third-party developers. Alexa skills are features that Alexa can leverage to do more than what its built-in features allow. For example, Alexa has native features that let it tell you weather and traffic forecasts, control smart home devices, and buy things from Amazon. Using third-party skills, Alexa can play soothing sleep sounds at night, read stories to your children, tell you random food facts, and act as the host of a trivia game for you and your friends.

Read 36 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google's Eric Schmidt Says People Want Dish-Washing Robots To Clean Up the Kitchen More Than Any Other Kind [Slashdot]

There is nothing that people want robots to be able to do more than to wash the dishes, according to Alphabet Chairman and former CEO Eric Schmidt. From a report: "When you ask a person what they would like a robot to do, the thing that they would like more than anyone else, is clean up the dishes in the kitchen," the billionaire Google executive says speaking at the Halifax International Security Forum. "That is literally the number one request. And I say this having done this exhaustively," he says. Though you may dream of a robot dishwasher, don't hold your breath for it to happen in the immediate future. "That turns out to be an extraordinarily difficult problem," says Schmidt.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Link [tinywords]

siblings…
the different narratives
of our childhood

 

Cloudflare CEO ponders legal methods of slowing down Ajit Pai's internet connection [Boing Boing]

As Trump FCC Chairman Ajit Pai tries to kill Net Neutrality under cover of Thanksgiving, Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince has tweeted that he is looking into ways that he can legally take up Josh Constantine's challenge to give Pai "14.4k dial-up speeds for killing net neutrality." (Image: Evan-Amos, CC-BY-SA) (via /.)

Trump Soho, funded by mobbed-up Russians, is taking Trump's name off the door [Boing Boing]

11 years ago, Trump made a big deal out of the Trump Soho, a 46-story luxury hotel/condo that paid Trump for the use of his name and the dubious management services of the Trump Organization; now, after a string of scandals including the revelation that Trump's business-partners were money-laundering Russian mafiosi, the revelation that Trump had defrauded buyers with lies about the sell-through, and the toxification of Trump's name for anyone with a lick of sense of decency, the business is parting ways with Trump. (more…)

Women are fleeing Donald Trump's Republican party in droves, and the GOP has no idea what to do about it [Boing Boing]

The Republican Party has always struggled to attract woman voters, but the triumph of admitted rapist Donald Trump and the party's backing of child-molester Roy Moore, the Dominionist misogyny of Mike Pence, and the painfully obvious hatred of women from the Grand Old Patriarchs has galvanized opposition to the Republicans from women who historically voted without much thought about gender issues: independents, reluctant Democrats, college-educated affluent white women, and other women whom the GOP relied on for votes, or at least indifference. (more…)

As The Holiday Season Gets Started, A Look Back At Aprons And Their Stories [News : NPR]

EllynAnne Geisel started Tie One On Day after she saw how much joy her gift of a baked good wrapped in an apron brought her neighbor who was dealing with hardship.

For EllynAnne Geisel, aprons are a way to connect to past generations, often women, who once wore them. For years she has collected different designs and shared the joy they bring her with others.

(Image credit: Courtesy of EllynAnne Geisel)

Rep. Joe Barton Apologizes After Lewd Photo Becomes Public [News : NPR]

Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, says the transcript of a recorded phone call is evidence of a crime against him. In the call, The Washington Post says he threatened to report the woman he was involved with to the Capitol Police if lewd materials he sent her became public.

The Texas Republican said that he sent the photo to a woman he was in a consensual relationship with while separated from his second wife, and regrets not having used "better judgment."

(Image credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Americans are spending Thanksgiving fighting for net neutrality [The Verge - All Posts]

Earlier this week, the Federal Communications Commission released its final plan to kill off the net neutrality policies put in place by Barack Obama. It did this just days before a major national holiday in the United States, and is giving the public just three weeks to react before the rollback will be voted on. But that timing hasn’t stifled the early response.

To start, BattleForTheNet.com, a virtual meeting ground that’s been put together by free internet advocacy groups and nonprofits, is reporting a surge in the number of phone calls that it’s helped direct to Congress. Almost 400,000 calls have been made this week, according to the website, with 270,000 of those coming in the last 24 hours alone.

Over at Change.org, seven new...

Continue reading…

12:00 EST

Singapore To Use Driverless Buses 'From 2022' [Slashdot]

Singapore plans to introduce driverless buses on its public roads by 2022. From a report: The government says they will be piloted in three new neighbourhoods which will have less-crowded roads designed to accommodate the buses. The buses will be used to help residents travel in their communities, and to nearby train and bus stations. Densely-populated Singapore hopes driverless technology will help the country manage its land constraints and manpower shortages. "The autonomous vehicles will greatly enhance the accessibility and connectivity of our public transport system, particularly for the elderly, families with young children and the less mobile," the Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan said. The autonomous buses are expected to complement existing manned bus services, and will initially operate during off-peak hours. Additionally, the government plans to let commuters hail on-demand shuttles using their mobile phones.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Thankful [Boing Boing]

A year ago today, Scots blogger Kevin Gray posted the final daily item at Nothing To Do With Arbroath, a "daily mish-mash" and perhaps the best blog ever to grace the web.

He posted again a few times to update readers on the serious illness that was consuming him, but the last we saw of Gray's inimitable eye for "stuff, fluff and nonsense" was this photo of police helping a family of ducks cross the road, published on November 23, 2016. A final update warned readers he had months to live, not years; he died days later, aged 56.

I'm thankful for many things this year, but none more so that my baby son and Kevin Gray. May his sense of wonder still guide us onward, with the diligent empathy of a Japanese traffic police officer, through chaos and heavy traffic.

William S. Burroughs: "A Thanksgiving Prayer" (1986) [Boing Boing]

Uncle Bill, in keeping with tradition, please lead us in A Thanksgiving Prayer.

Blame the US Retail Apocalypse on hedge funds and financialization, not Amazon and Walmart [Boing Boing]

America is in the midst of a "retail apocalypse": 6,800 chain stores are closing this year. It's true that online retailers and winner-take-alls like Walmart have delivered the coup de grace that finished off these stores, but the conditions that made them weak enough to kill are driven by Wall Street, not Walmart. (more…)

11:00 EST

Here’s how to emotionally manipulate your family with alcohol this holiday [Ars Technica]

Keeping things chill (or slightly below room temperature). (credit: korafotomorgana)

When it comes to engineering the fickle emotions of humans, alcohol can do it all. It’s raised for successes and downed in sorrow. It can energize and relax us. It temporarily erases regrets while creating new ones. It’s liquid courage and a downer. It can smooth a first date or conjure tears alone. And this holiday—as with every holiday—it’s likely to both smother and ignite family blow-ups.

But not every drink offers the same mood maneuvering powers, according to a new study in BMJ Open. Sifting through drinking survey responses of nearly 30,000 people from 21 countries, researchers found that drinkers turn to different types of alcohol for different moods and purposes.

For instance, about 53 percent of respondents thought that red wine relaxed them, and 60 percent reported it made them sleepy. So, if you’re looking for a pacifier for any hot-headed in-laws this holiday, maybe turn to a mellow merlot. For your more enjoyable guests, go with a cocktail. Nearly 60 percent of respondents felt that spirits both energized them and boosted their confidence. And 42 percent said it made them feel sexy. But maybe keep the martinis away from that hot-headed relative—nearly 30 percent of the survey takers thought that spirits made them aggressive.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Workers at Amazon's Main Italian Site To Hold First Strike on Black Friday [Slashdot]

An anonymous reader shares a report: Workers at Amazon's main distribution hub in Italy are planning their first ever strike for Friday, trade unions said, threatening to disrupt one of the busiest shopping days of the year. Like the rest of Europe, Italians in recent years have embraced the U.S. tradition of Black Friday, a day of heavy discounting by retailers on the day after Thanksgiving. Unions said in a statement more than 500 Amazon workers at the Piacenza site in northern Italy had agreed to strike following a failure to negotiate bonuses with the company. Workers have also decided not to do any overtime until Dec. 31, covering the peak season for the online retailer which hires temporary workers during this period.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How to patch the velveteen side of an air-mattress [Boing Boing]

Welcome to the holidays!

After many a slumber party, my kid told me the air mattress had developed an annoying slow leak. I used this patch kit.

The guy in the video found his leak a lot faster than I did. A LOT. Sigh. I used a spray bottle of soapy water. I used a safety razor to shave the fuzz off the mattress.

Tear-Aid Repair Type B Vinyl Inflatable Kit via Amazon

These Thanksgiving-themed cover songs are stuffed with corniness [The Verge - All Posts]

If you’re looking for some sick holiday jams to liven up your turkey binge today, look no further! YouTube and Twitter are full of the perfect holiday-themed covers to get you in the spirit to eat until you vomit.

A holiday cover is exactly what it sounds like: a popular song, rewritten and performed with lyrics about, say, Thanksgiving. Twitter user @LydiaBurrell has a running thread featuring clips from these songs if you just want to sample what’s available — a mix of songs like “Despacito,” “Hello,” and “Blank Space.” I’ve hand-picked a few of my favorites for you:

Continue reading…

Amazon workers at an Italy distribution hub are planning to strike on Black Friday [The Verge - All Posts]

Over 500 Amazon workers at the company’s main distribution hub in Italy are planning to go on strike on Black Friday, reports Reuters. Italian trade unions said the workers from Amazon’s Piacenza hub in northern Italy had agreed to strike for the first time after they failed to negotiate bonuses with Amazon. The workers also want pay raises to compensate for mandatory night shifts, overtime, or working six days in a row to keep up with logistical demands.

Additionally, starting from Black Friday, the striking workers will refuse overtime during the holiday season — typically the busiest season for the company — until December 31st.

The Piacenza hub has 1,600 permanent employees, and it was the first one built in Italy after Amazon...

Continue reading…

The BBC is adapting Neil Gaiman’s Anansi Boys as a radio drama [The Verge - All Posts]

Last year, the BBC Radio released an adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s beloved novel Stardust. Now, the network has announced that it is adapting another of Gaiman’s novels for the radio, Anansi Boys.

The six-part radio drama will premiere on Christmas day on BBC Radio 4, and will run through Friday, December 30th, and it will also be available online for overseas fans. The play will star Lenny Henry as Anansi/Mr Nancy, Jacob Anderson and and Nathan Stewart-Jarrett will voice Charlie and Spider, respectively. Dirk Maggs, who adapted BBC Radio’s adaptations of Stardust, Neverwhere and Good Omens, will helm this adaptation.

Gaiman published the novel in 2005, which follows a character named Charles Nancy, who’s life is upturned when he...

Continue reading…

10:00 EST

Mug shots: How Ars Technica editors prefer to stay caffeinated [Ars Technica]

Enlarge / Everyone's cabinets/cupboards basically look like this, right?

It's Thanksgiving in the US, and much of our staff is at work in a kitchen instead of an office space. As is becoming Ars tradition, we use such holiday times to provide a rare glimpse into life around the Orbital HQ: see prior peeks via deskspetschairs, or cars for example. Perhaps you can think of this as our way of bringing a classic green bean casserole to readers today.

No matter whether an office exists as brick-and-mortar or Orbiting, focuses on manufacturing, development, or journalist'ing, they all share one thing in common. It's not too many sweets for holiday parties or too many devices still relying on Windows Server 2003. It's that physical companion likely sitting directly to your side right now.

The humble mug can carry everything from Soylent to the best cup of coffee science can engineer. It warms minds and bodies so folks everywhere—even those handling IT in the Arctic or working in literal ice labs—can tackle whatever the day has in store. Mugs do more than carry your preferred beverage, of course. They have backstories that can take you briefly to a different time and place; they leave subtle bits of a person's personality out in the open for observant mug-watchers to notice.

Read 30 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Firefox Will Warn Users When Visiting Sites That Suffered a Data Breach [Slashdot]

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla engineers are working on a notifications system for Firefox that shows a security warning to users visiting sites that have suffered data breaches. The notifications system will use data provided by Have I Been Pwned?, a website that indexes public data breaches and allows users to search and see if their details have been compromised in any of these incidents. Work on this project has only recently started. The code to show these warnings is not even in the Firefox codebase but managed separately as an add-on available (on GitHub). The alert also includes an input field. In the add-ons current version this field doesn't do anything, but we presume it's there to allow users to search and see if their data was exposed during that site's security breach. Troy Hunt, Have I Been Pwned's author has confirmed his official collaboration with Mozilla on this feature.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Cloudflare Might Be Exploring a Way To Slow Down FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's Home Internet Speeds [Slashdot]

Late Wednesday night, TechCrunch reporter Josh Constine pleaded to tech billionaires to purchase local ISPs near FCC chairman Ajit Pai's home and slow down his Internet speeds. One of the responders to that tweet was Matthew Prince, co-founder and chief executive of Cloudflare, who said: I could do this in a different, but equally effective, way. Sent note to our GC to see if we can without breaking any laws. In a statement to Slashdot, Mr. Prince said: Probably the easiest thing would be to slow down requests from the FCC's IP ranges. Or put up an interstitial whenever someone from those IPs visits a site behind us. I think it's less likely we'd do it across the board ourselves, more likely we'd implement it as an option our customers could opt in to. Basically taking this a step further.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

OK, so it’s Thanksgiving [Pharyngula]

Who am I supposed to thank? Should I just be shouting “thank you” into the void, or feel generically grateful without cause or purpose, or be looking for some reason to feel I owe it to the universe to be praising it? Because I’m not feeling it.

This isn’t my kind of holiday. What day is Blamesgiving? Because I’d rather be snarling at a few evil bastards and punching them in face. Donald Trump, Ajit Pai, Mitch McConnell, Paul Ryan, the Alabama Idjit Brigade that’s lobbying for Ray Moore, all the people who picket Planned Parenthood, Republicans in general, Betsy Devos, Ken Ham…my list is endless, and just thinking about them all is making my punchin’ arm tired.

It’s probably a good thing my wife is me clean house and confining me to the kitchen to cook today’s dinner, because otherwise I’d just be boiling in frustration and bitterness.

Maybe you can thank her for keeping me out of your face today.

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Tynan | Life Outside the Box XML 10:00, Thursday, 23 November 18:00, Thursday, 23 November
Valerie Aurora's blog XML 13:00, Thursday, 23 November 17:00, Thursday, 23 November
W3C News XML 15:00, Thursday, 23 November 16:00, Thursday, 23 November
Wikipedia Signpost XML 15:00, Thursday, 23 November 17:00, Thursday, 23 November
Wikizine XML 15:00, Thursday, 23 November 17:00, Thursday, 23 November
Women4Wikipedia XML 13:00, Thursday, 23 November 17:00, Thursday, 23 November
Wooster Collective XML 15:00, Thursday, 23 November 16:00, Thursday, 23 November