Thursday, 22 February

Wednesday, 21 February

23:00 EST

Boston Dynamics Is Teaching Its Robot Dog To Fight Back Against Humans [Slashdot]

Zorro shares a report from The Guardian: Boston Dynamics' well-mannered four-legged machine SpotMini has already proved that it can easily open a door and walk through unchallenged, but now the former Google turned SoftBank robotics firm is teaching its robo-canines to fight back. A newly released video shows SpotMini approaching the door as before, but this time it's joined by a pesky human with an ice hockey stick. Unperturbed by his distractions, SpotMini continues to grab the handle and turn it even after its creepy fifth arm with a claw on the front is pushed away. If that assault wasn't enough, the human's robot bullying continues, shutting the door on Spot, which counterbalances and fights back against the pressure. In a last-ditch effort to stop the robot dog breaching the threshold, the human grabs at a leash attached to the back of the SpotMini and yanks. Boston Dynamics describes the video as "a test of SpotMini's ability to adjust to disturbances as it opens and walks through a door" because "the ability to tolerate and respond to disturbances like these improves successful operation of the robot." The firm helpfully notes that, despite a back piece flying off, "this testing does not irritate or harm the robot." But teaching robots to fight back against humans may might end up harming us.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Oughta be better than Sharknado [Pharyngula]

Amazon is going to make a movie of Iain Banks’ Consider Phlebas. That’s going to be tough. Not only would I consider much of it impossible to film, but The Culture isn’t exactly capitalism-friendly, and it will be interesting to see how a mega-corp can develop a movie that is counter to its own ethos without mangling it.

Also, it’s kind of a downer of a story, don’t you know? There isn’t going to be a sequel or a series with the cocky, devil-may-care hero, and I don’t think they’ll sell many t-shirts or video games of Bora Horza Gobuchul.

At least they’re not trying to make Use of Weapons. I don’t think that one would be popular with the happy-clappy space hero crowd.

U.S. Women's Hockey Leads Canada 1-0 In Gold Medal Final [News : NPR]

The U.S. women are facing Canada in a gold medal match iat the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. In their preliminary round match, players piled up in a scrum around the Canadian goal.

The American women won the very first Olympic hockey tournament, in 1998. But that was 20 years ago — Canada has won all of them since then.

(Image credit: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

21:00 EST

Former Google Employee Files Lawsuit Alleging the Company Fired Him Over Pro-Diversity Posts [Slashdot]

According to court documents filed today, a former Google engineer is suing the company for discrimination, harassment, retaliation, and wrongful termination. "Tim Chevalier, a software developer and former site-reliability engineer at Google, claims that Google fired him when he responded with internal posts and memes to racist and sexist encounters within the company and the general response to the now-infamous James Damore memo," reports The Verge. From the report: Chevalier said in a statement to The Verge, "It is a cruel irony that Google attempted to justify firing me by claiming that my social networking posts showed bias against my harassers." Chevalier, who is also disabled and transgender, alleges that his internal posts that defended women of color and marginalized people led directly to his termination in November 2017. He had worked at Google for a little under two years. Notably, Chevalier's posts had been quoted in Damore's lawsuit against Google -- in which Damore sued the company for discrimination against conservative white men -- as evidence Google permitted liberals to speak out at the company unpunished. Chevalier's lawsuit alleges that his firing is, in fact, a form of punishment. The lawsuit was filed in San Francisco County Superior Court and Chevalier is seeking damages for lost wages, emotional distress, punitive damages, and injunctive relief against those alleged harmful acts. Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Florida Shooting Survivor Weighs In On Meeting With President Trump [News : NPR]

Parents and survivors connected to the school shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Sandy Hook and Columbine, met with President Trump at the White House Wednesday to advocate for better protections for the nation's students.

Trump Backs Arming Teachers During Emotional White House Listening Session [News : NPR]

President Trump shakes hands with Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Ariana Klein as fellow Stoneman Douglas student Carson Abt watches at the start of a listening session on school safety with teachers and students at the White House Wednesday.

A week after 17 people were killed at a Parkland, Fla., high school, President Trump hosted survivors, parents and teachers from that and other recent school shooting tragedies.

(Image credit: AFP Contributor/Mandel Ngan)

Disney loses bid to stop Redbox from selling its digital download codes [The Verge - All Posts]

Last December Disney filed a lawsuit against Redbox in an effort to get the company to stop selling digital download codes for Disney films. But as The Hollywood Reporter notes, a California federal judge has rejected the studio’s request for an injunction that would have halted the practice. Instead, the judge called into question Disney’s stringent policies about the codes, accusing the studio of “copyright misuse.”

The case results from Redbox’s lack of an existing business arrangement with Disney. The rental service has distribution deals in place with major studios like Warner Bros., which allow Redbox to purchase physical DVDs and Blu-rays of popular movies that it then offers for rental at its standalone kiosks. Disney has struck...

Continue reading…

20:00 EST

Ex-Google engineer: I was fired for being too liberal [Ars Technica]

Enlarge (credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

An ex-Google engineer has sued his former employer, claiming that he was wrongfully terminated as a result of expressing his politically liberal opinions—which included opposing harassment and white supremacy—on internal message boards.

According to his lawsuit, which was filed Wednesday in state court in San Francisco, Tim Chevalier served as a site reliability engineer from December 2015 until November 2017.

Chevalier, who identifies himself as a “disabled, queer, and transgender” man, routinely spoke out in favor of minority and traditionally underprivileged rights—in particular to counter the opinions offered up by another then-colleague, James Damore.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Scientists Discover a New Way To Use DNA As a Storage Device [Slashdot]

Mark Wilson shares a report from BetaNews: Researchers from the Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) in Ireland have developed a way to use bacteria to archive up to up to one zettabyte in one gram of DNA. The technique uses double-strained DNA molecules called plasmids to encode data which is stored in the Novablue strain of the E Coli bacteria. The Novablue bacteria has a fixed location, making it viable for storage, and the data can be transferred by releasing a mobile HB101 strain of E Coli which uses a process called conjugation to extract the data. The antibiotics tetracycline and streptomycin are used to control this process. The method is currently not only expensive, but also slow. Data retrieval takes up to three days at the moment, but researchers believe it should be possible to dramatically speed up this process. Equipment already exists that can be used to write to DNA in seconds. Stability and security are also an issue right now, but it is very early days for the technique, and these current downsides are not viewed as being significant enough to write it off. Potential uses for this method of data storage that have been suggested include the recording of medical records in human DNA, and increasing the traceability of the food chain.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Game Industry Pushes Back Against Efforts To Restore Gameplay Servers [Slashdot]

Kyle Orland reports via Ars Technica: A group of video game preservationists wants the legal right to replicate "abandoned" servers in order to re-enable defunct online multiplayer gameplay for study. The game industry says those efforts would hurt their business, allow the theft of their copyrighted content, and essentially let researchers "blur the line between preservation and play." Both sides are arguing their case to the U.S. Copyright Office right now, submitting lengthy comments on the subject as part of the Copyright Register's triennial review of exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Analyzing the arguments on both sides shows how passionate both industry and academia are about the issue, and how mistrust and misunderstanding seem to have infected the debate.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

I am 💯 and you can too. [ragesoss]

100% test coverage! Catch all the bugs!

I’ve been working on a Ruby on Rails app for more than three years, and Ruby coverage for its rspec test suite has been at 100% for most of the last year. 😀

People with more experience may try to tell you this is a bad idea. Test what you need to test. 90% is a good rule of thumb. If you’re doing TDD right, you’ll be testing based on needs, and coverage will take care of itself.

No! Do it!

Why?

  • You’ll learn a lot about Rails, your gem dependencies, and your test tools.
  • It’ll help you write better tests and more testable code.
  • You will find bugs you didn’t know about!
  • It’s fun! Getting those tricky bits tested is a good puzzle.
  • Once you get there, it’s easy to maintain.

Okay, but how?

Lies!

You may have heard people say that code coverage is a lie. It’s true. For example, there are some tricksy ways to add specs for rake tasks to your test suite, but because rake tasks start from a different environment, they don’t integrate cleanly with simplecov. That’s why we exclude rake tasks from the coverage metrics in my app, even though we do test them.

Sadly, even once you reach 💯, it may be tough to keep it in the long run. Ruby 2.5 introduced a big change in the code coverage API. With that change, it has become possible for code coverage tools to report Branch Coverage rather than just line coverage, so the tricks with conditional modifiers and ternary operator may still not get you to 100% in the future. (The deep-cover gem also does this, without requiring Ruby 2.5.) But don’t fret; you’ll probably be able to do something like pin your coverage gem to the last version that just uses line coverage. A small price to pay for the peace of mind of knowing your app is 100% bug free. Or maybe it’s just a number to brag about. Either way, worth it!

 

Obviously this is not the case. But I still recommend trying to get to 100% coverage, for the reasons listed above.

Parents And Students Express Frustration During School Safety Meeting With Trump [News : NPR]

One week after 17 people were shot and killed at Majory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., students and parents sat down with President Trump to discuss school safety and gun control.

A New Survey Finds 81 Percent Of Women Have Experienced Sexual Harassment [News : NPR]

Activists participate in the Take Back The Workplace March and #MeToo Survivors March & Rally on Nov. 12, 2017, in Hollywood, Calif. A new survey offers the first set of nationwide data on prevalence, showing that the problem is pervasive and women are most often the victims.

A nationwide survey found that most women have experienced some form of sexual harassment, many since their teenage years. The results illustrate why the #MeToo movement was so successful.

(Image credit: Sarah Morris/Getty Images)

Former Google employee files lawsuit alleging the company fired him over pro-diversity posts [The Verge - All Posts]

A former Google engineer is suing the company for discrimination, harassment, retaliation, and wrongful termination, according to court documents filed today. Tim Chevalier, a software developer and former site-reliability engineer at Google, claims that Google fired him when he responded with internal posts and memes to racist and sexist encounters within the company and the general response to the now-infamous James Damore memo. News of Chevalier’s lawsuit was reported earlier today by Gizmodo.

Chevalier said in a statement to The Verge, “It is a cruel irony that Google attempted to justify firing me by claiming that my social networking posts showed bias against my harassers.” Chevalier, who is also disabled and transgender, alleges...

Continue reading…

19:00 EST

Floating Water [Maker Update #72] [Cool Tools]

This week on Maker Update, levitating water with LEDs, 3D printed skull buttons, servos on Pi, a game of Twang, Arduino animatronics, and project talk with Becky Stern. This week’s Cool Tool is the EBL 18650 Rechargeable Battery.

Show notes

-- Donald Bell

Apple In Talks To Buy Cobalt Directly From Miners [Slashdot]

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Apple Inc. is in talks to buy long-term supplies of cobalt directly from miners for the first time, according to people familiar with the matter, seeking to ensure it will have enough of the key battery ingredient amid industry fears of a shortage driven by the electric vehicle boom. The iPhone maker is one of the world's largest end users of cobalt for the batteries in its gadgets, but until now it has left the business of buying the metal to the companies that make its batteries. The talks show that the tech giant is keen to ensure that cobalt supplies for its iPhone and iPad batteries are sufficient, with the rapid growth in battery demand for electric vehicles threatening to create a shortage of the raw material. About a quarter of global cobalt production is used in smartphones. Apple is seeking contracts to secure several thousand metric tons of cobalt a year for five years or longer. Its first discussions on cobalt deals with miners were more than a year ago, and it may end up deciding not to go ahead with any deal, another person said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Supreme Court Gets Moving, Issuing As Many Decisions In One Day As It Has In 5 Months [News : NPR]

A man walks up in the fog at the U.S. Supreme Court to attend arguments last month. Justices issued multiple opinions on Wednesday.

The high court put out rulings on everything from guns and whistleblower protections to plea deals and the damages someone could seek for a terrorist attack.

(Image credit: J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

From Bellingham to Tallahassee Students 'Walk Out' Demanding Gun Reform [News : NPR]

Hundreds of students in the D.C. metro area marched to the Capitol and the White House Wednesday, demanding an end to school violence.

Students grappling with fear and frustration after last week's fatal school shooting staged peaceful protests mourning for victims and urging a ban on assault rifles.

(Image credit: Mikaela Lefrak/WAMU)

Moog is bringing back a modular synth from 1969 for $35,000 [The Verge - All Posts]

Moog announced last week that it is bringing back one of its iconic synthesizers — the IIIp — for a limited reissue for $35,000. The company says only 40 units will be handcrafted, and each one will feature the original’s documentation, art, and circuit board files. In total, each IIIp will have 37 modules including ten 901-Series audio oscillators, the 984 4-channel Matrix Mixer, and the 905 Spring Reverb.

Originally released in the late 1960s, the Moog Synthesizer IIIp was the company’s first portable system, coming in roadworthy flight cases, and was used by artists like Isao Tomita and George Harrison. They were discontinued in 1973 but are still coveted, not only because of their limitless ability to be reconfigured, but for the...

Continue reading…

Blame air currents for the East Coast’s warm spell, and also climate change [The Verge - All Posts]

The US East Coast has been unusually hot this week, breaking temperature records from Boston to Washington, DC. But what’s causing this sudden warm spell?

The answer has to do with the air currents in the atmosphere, according to Mark Chenard, a meteorologist at the Weather Prediction Center in College Mark, Maryland. Most of the time, winds in the atmosphere flow from west to east; this is called “zonal flow” and it’s responsible for our everyday weather. But every once in a while, the winds start flowing north to south, creating a pattern called “amplified flow.”

“Cold air from north comes down south, and warm air from the south goes north,” he says. So, warm air from the Gulf of Mexico is floating upward toward those of us in the...

Continue reading…

Exclusive: Telegram is holding a secretive second pre-ICO sale [The Verge - All Posts]

You have to admire Pavel Durov’s audacity.

Over the past few months, the CEO of Telegram convinced 81 accredited investors, including Silicon Valley giants Sequoia Capital and Benchmark, to give him $850 million in a presale of his company’s cryptocurrency in advance of an initial coin offering, or ICO. Now he’s trying to raise even more money from accredited investors before the coin gets offered to the public in a secretive second presale.

This week, investors got an email explaining that Telegram is doing another private presale, four sources with knowledge of the deal told The Verge.

The exact amount to be raised is still being determined, according to one source, but two other sources said Telegram is estimating it will be around...

Continue reading…

18:00 EST

100-Page Report Warns of the Many Dangers of AI [Slashdot]

dmoberhaus writes: Last year, 26 top AI researchers from around the globe convened in Oxford to discuss the biggest threats posed by artificial intelligence. The result of this two day conference was published today as a 100-page report. The report details three main areas where AI poses a threat: political, physical systems, and cybersecurity. It discusses the specifics of these threats, which range from political strife caused by fake AI-generated videos to catastrophic failure of smart homes and autonomous vehicles, as well as intentional threats, such as autonomous weapons. Although the researchers offer only general guidance for how to deal with these threats, they do offer a path forward for policy makers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New Lawsuit Accuses Tesla of Knowingly Selling Defective Vehicles [Slashdot]

A new lawsuit from a former Tesla employee claims the company knowingly sold defective cars, and that the employee was demoted and eventually fired after reporting the practice to his superiors. The lawsuit was filed in late January in New Jersey Superior Court under the Conscientious Employee Protection Act (CEPA). The Verge reports: The former employee, Adam Williams, worked for Tesla as a regional manager in New Jersey dating back to late 2011. While there, he says he watched the company fail "to disclose to consumers high-dollar, pre-delivery damage repairs" before delivering its vehicles, according to the complaint. Instead, he says the company sold these cars as "used," or labeled as "demo/loaner" vehicles. "There's no merit to this lawsuit. Mr. Williams' description of how Tesla sells used or loaner vehicles is totally false and not how we do things at Tesla," a representative for the company said in response to the lawsuit. "It's also at odds with the fact that we rank highest in customer satisfaction of any car brand, with more owners saying they'd buy a Tesla again than any other manufacturer. Mr. Williams was terminated at Tesla for performance reasons, not for any other reason." The lawyer for the plaintiff could not be reached in time for publish. Williams says in the court filing that he reported this behavior in late 2016 and early 2017 to his supervisor, as well as Lenny Peake, Tesla's East Coast Regional Manager, and Jerome Guillen, a company vice president. Shortly after that, he claims, he was demoted to service manager of the Springfield, New Jersey Tesla store. He then says he was demoted again later in the year to a "mobile manager" position and was ultimately fired in September 2017. In the lawsuit, Williams argues that he was terminated for reporting the alleged lawbreaking practices, and he should therefore be covered by CEPA's whistleblower protection.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

17:00 EST

Learning from scantily clad dancer scandal, Xbox exec calls for inclusivity [Ars Technica]

Enlarge / Microsoft's Phil Spencer speaks at the DICE conference in Las Vegas. (credit: Kyle Orland)

LAS VEGAS—In just over four years as head of Xbox and executive vice president of gaming at Microsoft, Phil Spencer has overseen some tough times for the gaming brand. But he says one of the most difficult lessons he has learned in that time came after a company-hosted Game Developers Conference party that featured scantily clad women dancing on podiums.

That "unequivocally wrong, unequivocally sexist, unequivocally intolerable choice" led to justifiable public backlash, Spencer recalled at a keynote speech at the DICE Summit in Las Vegas this morning, which Ars attended. But, he said, the "internal backlash at my own company was almost harsher." Instead of sidestepping responsibility, Spencer said he "absorbed the hit" as a leader and used it as an opportunity to "bet on what we stood for... we don't tolerate any employee or partner that enables or offends others... we stand for inclusivity."

Doing better

This sort of internal cultural transformation has been a deliberate focus for Microsoft since Satya Nadella became the company's third-ever CEO roughly four years ago, Spencer said. That company-wide "reboot" was especially necessary in the Xbox group, which Spencer admits was in a "world of pain" since "we hadn't done our best work with the announce[ment] of the Xbox One. The product we built wasn't meeting the expectations of our customers, market share was taking a nosedive, and it was painful to read all the headlines."

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Snapchat Responds To Change.Org Petition Complaining About the App's Redesign [Slashdot]

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Snapchat has posted an official response to users who signed a petition on Change.org asking the company to reverse its controversial update, which people say makes the app more difficult to use. In the response, Snapchat promises to make a few more changes to the Friends and Discover section in order to address user complaints. These changes were announced yesterday, along with GIF stickers from Giphy. The backlash against Snapchat has been growing in the months since the company rolled out a major revamp, which aimed to make the social app more accessible to a mainstream audience. Snapchat users have left the app bad reviews, complained on social media, turned to rival Instagram, and they signed a Change.org petition entitled, "Remove the new Snapchat update." Last night, Snapchat posted an official response to the petition, reiterating its stance but also promising a few tweaks that may help to address users' concerns. Specifically, the company said that "beginning soon on iOS and with Android in the coming weeks" it will introduce tabs in the Friends section and in Discover, which it says will make it easier for users to find the Stories they want. This update will let users sort things like Stories, Group Chats, and Subscriptions. Whether these tabs will placate users who just want the old Snapchat back remains to be seen.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

U.S. Biathlon Team Speaks Out For Gun Control [News : NPR]

Tim Burke and other American biathletes spoke out about guns after the shooting in Parkland, Fla. Burke is seen here during the 10km Sprint Biathlon on Feb. 11 at the Pyeongchang Olympic Games.

The sport's athletes must ski across the course, then calm their breathing and use rifles to fire at a target. For biathletes, the fact that their sport involves firearms isn't always comfortable.

(Image credit: Lars Baron/Getty Images)

After Long Drought, Has U.S. Olympic Long Track Speedskating Turned A Corner? [News : NPR]

On Wednesday, U.S. long track skaters won bronze in the women's team pursuit event — the first Olympic medal since 2010. Here's a look at what it's like for U.S. athletes to compete in this sport.

(Image credit: David J. Phillip/AP)

Donald Trump Jr. Is Impressed By The 'Smile On A Face' Of India's Poor [News : NPR]

Donald Trump Jr. at a photo session after visiting Trump Tower Kolkata, a Trump Organization apartment building in India. Its website says it is "synonymous with celebrated luxury."

He may have thought he was paying the poor a compliment. India's poor, however, do not always have reason to smile.

(Image credit: Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Why There Will Likely Never Be Another Pastor Like Billy Graham [News : NPR]

The pastor to presidents — that's how Billy Graham was known. He earned that role because he earned their trust, and there will likely never be another like him.

Kurds Asking For Help From Syrian Forces To Repel Turkish Attacks In Syrian War [News : NPR]

The Syrian war has taken a new twist as Kurds have asked for help from Syrian forces to repel Turkish attacks. It's an area where the U.S., Iran and Russia are already on the ground backing various sides.

Tanzania's Biggest City Finds Success With Region's First Bus Rapid Transit System [News : NPR]

Dar es Salaam is the only East African city with a bus rapid transit system. It is a model for so many African cities that are growing at an intense pace, but don't have the kind of money they need to build more expensive infrastructure.

Around 100 Girls Are Missing In Nigeria After Boko Haram Attacks School [News : NPR]

Boko Haram insurgents attacked a girls school in northeastern Nigeria, and initial reports suggested scores of children might be missing. Authorities say militants also took off with foodstuffs. Boko Haram fighters have seized thousands of captives over the years, most famously the Chibok girls.

Yale's Whiffenpoofs A Cappella Group Admits First Woman [News : NPR]

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Sofia Campoamor, the first female member to be selected to for Yale's a cappella group, The Whiffenpoofs, since its founding in 1909.

U.N. Calling For Ceasefire After Hundreds Of Civilians Killed In Damascus Suburb [News : NPR]

A Syrian government offensive against a rebel-held suburb of Damascus has killed hundreds of civilians. The United Nations and humanitarian groups are urgently calling for a ceasefire to little effect so far.

West Point Posthumously Admits Florida Shooting Victim Who Helped His Classmates Escape [News : NPR]

Peter Wang died holding open a door to help his classmates escape last week's shooting in Parkland, Fla. It was his dream to go to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Now, the academy's posthumously admitted him.

Feeds

FeedRSSLast fetchedNext fetched after
XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
… My heart’s in Accra XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
0xadada.github.io XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Aaron Shaw's weblog XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
academic coach XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Andrew Lih XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Ars Technica XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Black Girl Dangerous XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Blog – Cal Newport XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Blog – Cal Newport XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Boing Boing XML 01:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:30, Thursday, 22 February
Camels With Hammers XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 05:00, Thursday, 22 February
Comments for The Ancient Wisdom Project XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Cool Tools XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
copyrighteous XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Cyborgology XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Derek Sivers XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Digital History Hacks (2005-08) XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Dullicious.net XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
eon XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Explorations of Style XML 08:00, Wednesday, 21 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Future of the Internet – And how to stop it. XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Geek Feminism Blog XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Geek&Poke XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 09:00, Thursday, 22 February
goatee XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 05:00, Thursday, 22 February
Greg Goodale XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Hacker News XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Interprete XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Jimmy Wales XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Joho the Blog XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Joi Ito's Web XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Latest Articles XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
LESSIG Blog, v2 XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 09:00, Thursday, 22 February
Lifehacker XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Mel Chua XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 05:00, Thursday, 22 February
MichaelZimmer.org XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Ming Thein | Photographer XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 09:00, Thursday, 22 February
miromi XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Mr. Money Mustache XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
natematias's blog XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
NeuroLogica Blog XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
News : NPR XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Nikki XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
OkTrends XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Open Wiki Blog Planet XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
patdavid.net XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 09:00, Thursday, 22 February
Pharyngula XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 05:00, Thursday, 22 February
Philip Greenspun's Weblog XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
PressThink XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Priceonomics Blog XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 05:00, Thursday, 22 February
Professional-Lurker: Comments by an academic in cyberspace XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
ProfHackerProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
quarlo XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 09:00, Thursday, 22 February
ragesoss XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Slashdot XML 01:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:30, Thursday, 22 February
Stories by Yonatan Zunger on Medium XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Strobist XML 01:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:12, Thursday, 22 February
Sublime Blog XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 09:00, Thursday, 22 February
The age of us – The Conversation XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
The Verge - All Posts XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
This Sociological Life XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
tinywords XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Tynan | Life Outside the Box XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 08:00, Thursday, 22 February
Valerie Aurora's blog XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
W3C News XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Wikipedia Signpost XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Wikizine XML 23:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Women4Wikipedia XML 21:00, Wednesday, 21 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February
Wooster Collective XML 00:00, Thursday, 22 February 01:00, Thursday, 22 February