Friday, 29 May

12:00

Will in-car HUDs make the roads hell? [Boing Boing]

Dashboard-mounted cameras provide a world of youtube schadenfreude—bad drivers and insurance fraudsters getting their public comeuppance—but also come wedded to the promise of safety and security from those things.

Read the rest

The supermarket of lost luggage [Boing Boing]

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If lost luggage isn't reunited with its owner after 90 days, it may end up at the Unclaimed Baggage Center in Scottsboro, Alabama, where the contents are sorted and sold in what looks like a thrift store for packed possessions. Read the rest

A book that teaches you how to survive almost anything [Boing Boing]

In 2010 adventurer and author Ed Stafford became the first person to walk along the Amazon River from start to end (4,000 miles and over 2 years!), earning him a Guinness World Record.

Read the rest

OK Go's Damian Kulash: "How Herbie Hancock's Rockit changed my life" [Boing Boing]

HerbieHancock_Rockit

At Cuepoint, OK Go singer/guitarist Damian Kulash writes about the song that changed his life when he was 7-years-old, Herbie Hancock's electro-funk classic "Rockit." Read the rest

Apply for a Legend of Zelda college scholarship [Boing Boing]

Are you a college student who embodies the virtues of the Triforce and needs five hundred bucks for school? Read the rest

South African canopy walkway is breathtaking [Boing Boing]

1Q4Rtm6zOdRJWptVGCmOjzAi0AaLZXLuW8-bqoEFGLQ

Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden near Cape Town, South Africa, offers visitors the chance to walk above the trees. Read the rest

Who could resist these green plastic businessmen figurines? [Boing Boing]

His way of life is being threatened from all sides. The women who once brought him coffee and washed his underwear are telling him to go to hell.

Read the rest

Mr. Tape, 1991: Soviet DJ spins reel-to-reel tape deck in classic hip-hop showcase [Boing Boing]

A classic viral video that's been making the rounds since viral videos were shared on VHS tapes. (more…)

Robotic cheetah can now see and leap over hurdles as it runs [Boing Boing]

That robotic cheetah built by MIT researchers? They've now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs, making it “the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.” (more…)

What it's like to be a clown in an age when people think it's fun to hate and fear clowns [Boing Boing]

David Magidson is a 52-year-old Bay Area husband and father of two boys who gets nervous whenever he's about to perform, because many adults say clowns are terrifying.

Read the rest

Photos of the Golden Gate Bridge grand opening (1937) [Boing Boing]

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Seventy-eight years ago this week, the Golden Gate Bridge opened across the San Francisco Bay. Read the rest

Report: During Canada tax raid, Uber “remotely encrypted corporate data” [Boing Boing]

“Uber Engineers in San Francisco tried to remotely encrypt the data in Uber Canada computers during a search conducted by Revenu Québec in Montreal last week,” reports La Presse. Read the rest

Uber Revises Privacy Policy, Wants More Data From Users [Slashdot]

itwbennett tips news that Uber has amended its privacy policy, making it much simpler to read and understand. But the policy also includes changes to what data Uber collects about its riders. Beginning July 15th, the Uber phone app will keep track of a rider's location while it's running in the background. Uber says riders will be able to opt out of this tracking. The policy changes also allow for advertising using the rider's contact list: "for example the ability to send special offers to riders' friends or family." The revision of Uber's privacy policy followed complaints at the end of last year that the company was overstepping its bounds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Underground Hacking Economy [Slashdot]

Fast Company profiles the rise of sites like Hackers List and Hackers For Hire, which provide consolidated markets for people to hire hackers to break passwords, alter databases, learn to operate malware, and more. People with the skills to circumvent security are putting themselves out there as freelancers for specific tasks, and people in need of their services are posting notices asking for help. Law enforcement agencies are warning about this new type of behavior, saying it's often illegal, and facilitated by online anonymity and cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. The number of deals currently being made through these sites remains small, but it's growing — particularly among business seeking to gain an advantage over competitors in other countries.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

11:00

Shadow [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

daviwie has added a photo to the pool:

Shadow

Shot on Kodak Ektar 100 @400 (35 mm C41)

M in L'viv [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

tatzlum.photo has added a photo to the pool:

M in L'viv

L'viv, Ukraine, May 2015

PALM SPRINGS AIR MUSEUM 019 [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

Larry Mendelsohn has added a photo to the pool:

PALM SPRINGS AIR MUSEUM 019

Who says you need a telephoto to shoot an air show? Shot with X100S (35mm equivalent lens)

Cox Pit [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

Joseph Forsyth has added a photo to the pool:

Cox Pit

This photo was taken with a Konica EE-Matic Delux film camera and Kodak TX 400 black and white film.
Vancouver BC Canada.May24/2015.

Red [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

daviwie has added a photo to the pool:

Red

Shot on Kodak Ektar 100 @400 (35 mm C41)

Old Swany River [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

icypics has added a photo to the pool:

Old Swany River

River Vltava, Prague

New chair - Muizenberg [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

Paul Perton has added a photo to the pool:

New chair - Muizenberg

Press L to view on a black background.


PPDOTCOM

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You can see more on my Flickr Photostream or on my Web site.

This image is mine. You may not use it anywhere or for any project without my express permission. Rates for commercial applications are available on request.

Please contact me if you would like to buy a print of this photograph.

Lost At The Harbour [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

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Lost At The Harbour

La Rochelle, France

The Harbour [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

RudyMareelPhotography has added a photo to the pool:

The Harbour

La Rochelle, France

From Night Comes the Day [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

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From Night Comes the Day

Noble Falls, Western Australia.

20150528_1148 [mingthein.com: the reader portfolio Pool]

dw_ross has added a photo to the pool:

20150528_1148

Female Ruby-Throated Hummingbird. Nikon 1 V1, generic adapter, PK-13 extension tube, Tokina 400mm f/5.6 SD @ f/8, ISO 400, 1/20 second, tripod, remote release.

PSA: Xbox One with two Assassin’s Creed games for $300 [Ars Technica]

Until today, the lowest retail price we've seen for a new Xbox One console showed up on last year's Black Friday and Cyber Monday, when multiple retailers offered Kinect-free systems bundled with various games for $329.99. Today, electronics discounter Blutek USA has undercut those previous deals through an eBay sale, offering an Xbox One with Assassin's Creed Black Flag and Assassin's Creed Unity for $299.99. The eBay page warns that a "limited quantity" of systems is available, and 310 have already sold as of this writing, so it's unclear just how long you'll be able to take advantage of this offer.

The same bundle is still going for the MSRP of $350 at many other retailers, though you can find returned or refurbished systems for as low as $315. If you're not interested in the Assassin's Creed games, $350 will get you a bundle with Halo: The Master Chief Collection at most stores, and Best Buy will also throw in a year of Xbox Live or an extra controller for $40 more.

Long-time console price-watchers might remember that many retailers, including the Microsoft Store, started selling the Kinect-bundled Xbox One for $450 months before Microsoft officially dropped Kinect from the package and lowered the price to $400 in May. It's way too early to say if this single sale is a sign that another official price drop is coming, but with E3 just a few weeks away, another aggressive pricing move like last year's holiday price drop is certainly possible.

Read on Ars Technica | Comments

Gladiator scoop hook $4 FS at HD [Slickdeals Frontpage RSS Feed]

Gladiator scoop hook $4 FS at HD

Thumb Score: +18
HomeDepot.com has Gladiator GearTrack and GearWall Scoop Hook on sale for $4. Shipping is free. Thanks b2b3j2

Deal Editor's Notes & Price Research: Our research indicates that Gladiator GearTrack and GearWall Scoop Hook is $1.75 lower (30% savings) than the next best available price from a reputable merchant with prices starting at $5.75. - daisybeetle

South Beach Diet Good To Go Bars, Extra Protein, Double Peanut Butter, 1.34 Ounce, 5 Count (Pack of 8) $13 or less + free shipping (additional flavors) [Slickdeals Frontpage RSS Feed]

South Beach Diet Good To Go Bars, Extra Protein, Double Peanut Butter, 1.34 Ounce, 5 Count (Pack of 8) $13 or less + free shipping (additional flavors)

Thumb Score: +34
Amazon.com has 8-Pack of 5-Count South Beach Diet Good To Go Bars on sale from $13 after 'clipped' 30% off coupon (clipped automatically through link when logged in to Amazon) and checking out via Subscribe & Save. Shipping is free. Thanks quikwit
Also available, Amazon.com has for their Prime Members: 8-Pack of 5-Count South Beach Diet Good To Go Bars on sale from $13 after 'clipped' 30% off coupon (clipped automatically through link when logged in to Amazon) and checking out via Subscribe & Save. Shipping is free.
Note, must be logged into your account. You may cancel your Subscribe & Save subscription any time after your order ships.


Deal Editor's Notes & Price Research: Save 15%, as opposed to the standard 5%, on this month's Subscribe & Save items when you subscribe to 5 or more items during your current subscription month. - daisybeetle

JBL Monoblock GTO Class-D Car Amplifier (Recertified) $89 + Free Shipping [Slickdeals Frontpage RSS Feed]

JBL Monoblock GTO Class-D Car Amplifier (Recertified) $89 + Free Shipping

Thumb Score: +29
HarmanAudio.com also has JBL Monoblock GTO Class-D Car Amplifier (Recertified GTO-501EZ {Pictured}) for $139.99 - $50.99 w/ promo code GTO501DEAL = $89. Shipping is Free.

No longer available:

HarmanAudio.com has Infinity Primus 6"x9" 3-Way Car Speaker (Recertified PR9603IS-Z) for $83.99 - $44.99 w/ promo code PR9603DEAL = $39. Shipping is Free. Thanks DJ3xclusive

PSA: Make Sure You Have a Good Ice Pack in Your Freezer [Lifehacker]

If you’re spending more time outdoors as the weather warms up, a good ice pack can come in handy, whether you use it to soothe burns or injuries, or just want to keep cool. Now’s the time to put a good one in your freezer, and the Paradice P500 is a great option.

Read more...









Use a Takeout Menu as the Contact Photo for a Restaurant [Lifehacker]

Ordering takeout isn’t exactly difficult, but why not make it easier? Take a photo of a menu and make it the restaurant’s contact photo on your phone. Next time you’re craving takeout, you can skip searching for the menu in your junk drawer.

Read more...









Lobster Butter: An Awesome Use For Leftover Shells [Lifehacker]

Summer’s unofficially arrived, and with it, lobster season. Next time you splurge on the crustaceans, bear in mind the best way to get all the meat out of them — and don’t throw away those shells, because you can use them to make a fantastic lobster butter.

Read more...









How Much to Ask for When You're Negotiating Salary [Lifehacker]

Negotiating your salary isn’t easy. And one of the biggest hurdles is knowing how much to ask for. As a general rule of thumb, your number should be 10 to 20 percent more than what you’re earning now.

Read more...









Google Smart Lock Saves Your Passwords, Logs In on Chrome and Android [Lifehacker]

Google already has many features to make it easier to manage the bajillion passwords you have. With an upcoming release of Google Play Services, the company will be introducing a feature called Smart Lock that can store your passwords for third-party services and log into them across devices.

Read more...









Create a Hidden Costs Budget to Find What's Draining Your Resources [Lifehacker]

Most of us have a budget of the things that we pay for. However, that’s not the same as things that cost us money. If you’re trying to improve your budget, start including a section for the things that cost you in areas like productivity, health, or time.

Read more...









Here's Apple's Temporary Fix For Its iPhone-Crashing Messages Bug [Lifehacker]

Earlier this week, it came to light that a simple text message can crash Messages on any iPhone it’s sent to . Apple hasn’t fixed the problem at a software level yet—but it does have a temporary solution that you can use if you’re affected.

Read more...









Crowdfunded, Solar-powered Spacecraft Goes Silent [Slashdot]

Last week saw the successful launch of the Planetary Society's LightSail spacecraft, the solar-powered satellite that runs Linux and was crowdfunded on Kickstarter. The spacecraft worked flawlessly for two days, but then fell silent, and the engineering team has been working hard on a fix ever since. They've pinpointed the problem: a software glitch. "Every 15 seconds, LightSail transmits a telemetry beacon packet. The software controlling the main system board writes corresponding information to a file called beacon.csv. If you're not familiar with CSV files, you can think of them as simplified spreadsheets—in fact, most can be opened with Microsoft Excel. As more beacons are transmitted, the file grows in size. When it reaches 32 megabytes—roughly the size of ten compressed music files—it can crash the flight system." Unfortunately, the only way to clear that CSV file is to reboot LightSail. It can be done remotely, but as anyone who deals with crashing computers understands, remote commands don't always work. The command has been sent a few dozen times already, but LightSail remains silent. The best hope may now be that the system spontaneously reboots on its own.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A Chocolate Science Sting [NeuroLogica Blog]

John Bohannon is at it again. In 2013 he published the results of a sting operation in which he submitted terrible papers with fake credentials to 304 open access journals. Over half of the journals accepted the paper for publication. He published his results in Science magazine, and it caused a bit of a stir, although arguably not as much as it should have.

Bohannon was asked to repeat this feat, this time to expose the schlocky science of the diet industry. He was asked to do this for a documentary film which will be release shortly, but he has already published his reveal. You can read his full account for details, but here is the quick summary.

He collaborated with others to perform a real (although crappy) scientific study. His researchers recruited 16 people, with one drop out, the remaining 15 were divided into three groups: low carb diet for three week, low carb diet plus daily chocolate for three weeks, and no change in diet. The results were no surprising in that the two diet groups lost 5 pounds on average, while the no diet group did not. However, they also found that the chocolate group lost 10% more weight. He explains:

Here’s a dirty little science secret: If you measure a large number of things about a small number of people, you are almost guaranteed to get a “statistically significant” result. Our study included 18 different measurements—weight, cholesterol, sodium, blood protein levels, sleep quality, well-being, etc.—from 15 people. (One subject was dropped.) That study design is a recipe for false positives.

Think of the measurements as lottery tickets. Each one has a small chance of paying off in the form of a “significant” result that we can spin a story around and sell to the media. The more tickets you buy, the more likely you are to win. We didn’t know exactly what would pan out—the headline could have been that chocolate improves sleep or lowers blood pressure—but we knew our chances of getting at least one “statistically significant” result were pretty good.

Yes, our old friend p-hacking. Bohannon is simply demonstrating effects that we have been discussing here and on science-based medicine for years – published small studies are likely to be false positives because they are more susceptible to quirky results and manipulation through p-hacking. Throw in a little publication bias and we have a literature flooded with worthless positive studies.

I have argued that the press should not even be reporting such preliminary studies. They are nothing but noise in the background of science. At best they serve as a way to guide future research (by giving some indication of which questions are worthwhile and helping design more rigorous studies). They are useful for scientists, but really should not be presented to the public as if their results were reliable.

Here Bohannon is using one common method of p-hacking – multiple analysis. He looked at 18 variables, but did not adjust the statistic to reflect this. You can make an adjustment for multiple analysis so that the p-values reflect the “multiple lottery tickets.” At least then the p-value is legitimate. Otherwise the p-value is meaningless.

Even when legitimate, p-values are problematic. Some scientific journals are discouraging or even banning their use. The essence of the problem is that p-values are being over-used as a single measure of reliability of scientific results. The p-value was never meant to be used this way. It is only really a quick assessment of how seriously to take the data, or the signal to noise ratio in the data. But because p-value became the one measure of a study’s results, that lead to methods that essentially amount to p-hacking – tweaking the methods and massaging the data until you get across the magical 0.05 p-value.

Mutliple analysis is just one of those methods (sometimes called researcher degrees of freedom). Other methods include collecting data until you get the result you want, making multiple comparisons among the variables, and looking at multiple types of statistical analysis then using the one that works the “best.” These tricks are often done innocently, and sometimes not-so-innocently.

It is great that more attention is being paid to these problems with published scientific studies, and Bohannon’s efforts should be applauded.

This is a good time to point out, however, that these problems do not mean that science is broken or that no results can be trusted. It just means you have to understand the structure of the scientific literature and how to interpret results. Science progresses through eventually performing high quality studies with clear results that can be independently replicated. Until we get to this level of evidence I am suspicious of any claims.

Preliminary, small, soft, one-off studies are just noise. I pay no attention to them (although I do pay attention to the sloppy press they often receive). More robust results start to get interesting, and then you have to pay attention to plausibility. There is no sharp demarcation line, but at some point the combination of plausibility and direct evidence is sufficient to conclude that a phenomenon is more likely to be true than untrue. Of course, scientific conclusions are always tentative and subject to revision, but probabilities can reach so high that it is reasonable to treat certain conclusions as if they were facts. At the very least, overturning them would require a mountain of evidence equal to the mountain of evidence that establishes them as true.

I can’t give you a formula for this. It takes scientific knowledge and judgment. That is why we further rely on the consensus of scientific opinion to indicate when a claim has crossed the threshold and should be generally accepted. The judgment of any individual scientist can be quirky or mistaken, but the consensus of many scientists has a greater chance of being valid because individual quirkiness should average out. It is like crowdsourcing, but within an expert population.

In any case, this is the best we can do. It has proven very effective overall, as the amazing progress in science and technology attests. So we are clearly doing something right.

But we can do better. I look at this in terms of efficiency. Science is grinding forward, and eventually most claims work themselves out. Bad ideas do not get long term traction within science, while good ideas eventually do. The real question is, how rapid and efficient is this progress. Sloppy research techniques and poor journal filters slow progress by making the system inefficient.

I would argue that sloppy science journalism does as well by contributing to the scientific illiteracy of the population. The elaborate and expensive institutions of science depend upon public support. Public beliefs also tend to drive funding and therefore research, and sometimes scientists have to waste resources addressing popular, but not very scientifically valid, ideas. Think of the money wasted researching highly implausible alternative medicine treatments, or proving yet again that vaccines do not cause autism.

How much more rapid would our progress be if these inefficiencies were worked out of the system, or at least minimized?

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Islamic State Claims Responsibility For Second Saudi Attack [News]

The attack on a Shiite mosque in the kingdom's Eastern Province is the second suicide bombing in as many weeks in which the Saudi branch of ISIS has claimed responsibility.

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Look Who's Hanging Out With A Goat! It's Supermodel Chrissy Teigen [News]

She's not the only example of a cross-species friend. Goats pal around with hippos and giraffes, too. We probe the science of goat behavior to see what makes them such good friends.

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The debate on lethal robots is starting too late [The Verge - All Posts]

The killer robots are coming, and they’re coming soon. Whether it's self-piloted drones or Big Dog-style walkers, self-piloted crafts are already here, and adding autonomous weapons is a natural next step. By now, the question isn't can we, but should we?

That question came to a head this April, when the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (or CCW) met in Geneva to discuss the issue, and in the wake of the meeting, a number of researchers and professors have weighed in publicly. Earlier this week, political scientists Michael Horowitz and Paul Scharre urged caution on autonomous systems in The New York Times, while Berkeley computer scientist Stuart Russell encouraged further debate with a column in Nature.

Continue reading…

New trailers: Point Break, Black Mass, The Daily Show, and more [The Verge - All Posts]

We've done it everyone. We've gone a week without a superhero trailer. At least, so long as you aren't counting superhuman athletes, sleeper secret agents, and The Rock in general. Either way, there's a good mixture of trailers out this week, including some huge films — like Point Break — and some offbeat small ones with a lot of interesting ideas in them. You can check out this week's 10 best below.

Continue reading…

The Vergecast 155: Google I/O 2015 [The Verge - All Posts]

This week we have a special Google I/O edition of the Vergecast, guest hosted by Ross Miller, Emily Yoshida, Dan Seifert, and Sam Sheffer. They discuss the announcements out of the keynote, including Now on Tap, Photos, Android M, Cardboard, and the fact that Dan cannot tell his own children apart.

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You can finally use GIFs on Facebook, here are GIFs we recommend [The Verge - All Posts]

You can finally use GIFs on Facebook! Sort of! If you drop a link to a GIF uploaded elsewhere on the internet in your status update, the GIF will appear in full animated glory. However, if you upload a GIF directly to Facebook, the GIF will be converted into a static image. At least that's the case for the time being.

What does this mean for Facebook? The answer is obvious. Words and video will give way to the dominant vocabulary of our generation: reaction GIFs plucked from random Tumblrs. We must cherish this moment in history, before the inevitable future in which language as we know it is purged to make room for an all-emoji communication.

Because we at The Verge care about you, we thought it vital to provide the GIFs that will be...

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This drone footage lets you soar over gorgeous Antarctica [The Verge - All Posts]

Kalle Ljung is a lucky man with a drone. During a 16-day trip between December and January, the Swedish photographer and his 73-year-old father sailed through the Antarctic. It was already a special trip, but Ljung also happened to have his new DJI Phantom 2 along for the ride. Using a GoPro Hero3+Black Edition, he was able to record 250 minutes worth of stunning footage, full of glaciers, humpback whales, and superbly blue water. In an interview with Wired, he simply said, "I wanted to show the beauty but also the loneliness." We'll just say it here: we're jealous.

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Don't expect to see live streams of your favorite NFL teams practicing [The Verge - All Posts]

Live-streaming apps like Periscope and Meerkat have the potential to add a new dimension to sports by giving fans live, behind-the-scenes insight into their favorite teams. Or, they might if sporting authorities allowed it. As the NFL off-season begins to pick up steam with training camps and practices — perhaps ideal fodder for live streaming — it seems that even the teams themselves are banned from using Periscope (and, we assume, Meerkat as well).

As spotted by The Daily Dot yesterday, the New Orleans Saints' Twitter account tweeted that it's an "NFL rule" that "teams aren't allowed to use Periscope" at practices in response to a fan's question. Then, when answering a follow-up question about the many teams who have official accounts...

Continue reading…

How an artificial language from 1887 is finding new life online [The Verge - All Posts]

On a recent Friday evening, the Esperanto Society of New York convened in a rowhouse on Manhattan’s East 35th Street. The upper floors of the building seemed to house a bilingual preschool, going by the many large surfaces covered in multicolored paint handprints, while the ground floor was made up of multipurpose meeting rooms administered by the Unitarian Universalist church down the block.

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