Thursday, 25 May

08:00 EDT

A prisoner in solitary confinement was the only survivor of the worst volcanic disaster of the 20th century [Boing Boing]

Mount Pelée, on the Caribbean island of Martinique, erupted in 1902, killing 30,000 people in the scenic town of Saint-Pierre. But rescuers found one man alive -- a 27-year-old laborer in a dungeon-like jail cell. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll meet Ludger Sylbaris, who P.T. Barnum called "The Only Living Object That Survived in the Silent City of Death."

We'll also address some Indian uncles and puzzle over a gruesome hike.

Show notes

Please support us on Patreon!

Cars parked on the mean streets of mid-1970s New York City [Boing Boing]

Cars: New York City, 1974–1976 collects over 100 of Langdon Clay's creepy shots of cars parked overnight on the streets of New York at its lowest ebb. The scenes evoke Taxi Driver, The Warriors, even a little Snake Plisken. (more…)

Vintage isochrone maps show 19th-century travel times [Boing Boing]

In the late 19th century, travel times became a thing of fascination as modes of transportation improved by leaps and bounds (e.g., Around the World in 80 Days, published in 1873). Great thinkers of the day like Francis Galton even devised isochrone maps, which showed how long it would take to get from a central point to other points of interest. (more…)

Op-ed recommendation: “Why Straight Men Kill The Trans Women They Love” [Boing Boing]

In this new op-ed, L.A.-based writer, actor, and trans activist Jen Richards explores the tragic phenomenon of straight men who murder the trans women they love. As she puts it, “Bigotry is rarely as simple as we’d like to believe.” Richards starts by detailing a romantic encounter she once had with a man named Mark, who suddenly became agitated. She writes:

I know what the story would be if my lifeless body were later found, and if Mark were arrested. He would say that I didn’t tell him I was trans. That I came to his hotel room and it was only when we were in bed that he discovered I was “really a man.” That he panicked and the next thing he knew I was no longer breathing. If the case went to court, his lawyers would argue “trans panic,” an admissible defense in 49 states. And the only person who could contradict his statement, me, would be unable to. I would be further proof of a stubbornly pervasive narrative: the man who dresses up as a woman to trick a man. We as a society have decided that such deception justifies murder. He might go to jail for involuntary manslaughter—maybe—but there’d undoubtedly be sympathy for him, too. How awful to think you’re with a woman and have it turn out to be a man. (The unspoken subtext being “the faggot had it coming.”)

No one would know that Mark sought me out in a forum specifically for men looking for trans women. That he was one of many straight men who watch trans pornography, hire trans escorts, troll Craigslist for “discreet” hookups, go to clubs trans women are known to frequent, or look for trans sex workers on the “stroll” that every city has. No one would know I don’t trick men, that I don’t need to.

I made it out unharmed that night, but many women like me don’t.

Richards goes on to tell the story of 17-year-old Mercedes Williamson, a trans girl killed by her boyfriend. She ties both stories into broader issues of toxic masculinity, which can be fueled by things even as seemingly innocuous as a crude joke made by a Bachelorette contestant. The full article is well worth a read and is available on Logo’s New Now Next website.

A great look back at Soviet futurism [Boing Boing]

This summer, the Barbican is mounting Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction. As part of that, they will be displaying some rare Soviet-era sci-fi collectibles from the seminal Tekhikia – Molodezhi magazine, according to a great overview by It's Nice That. (more…)

An awesome Beatles-scored tap dance routine [Boing Boing]

Dancer/choreographer Nick Young uses The Beatles’ “Come Together” as inspiration for this gorgeously shot tap dance number.

Watch how maple syrup harvesting has gone high-tech [Boing Boing]

Buckets hanging on maple trees may have worked great 200 years ago, but modern producers use a system like the internet: a series of tubes! (more…)

Watch this artist assemble her gorgeous papercraft portraits [Boing Boing]

Yulia Brodskaya (previously) creates beautiful textured portraits by tightly folding and quilling colorful paper and affixing it upright on a flat surface. Here's a timelapse of her piece Girl with peacock earrings. (more…)

Taste-testing weird, internet-famous pizzas [Boing Boing]

First We Feast’s Sean Evans teams up with The Pizza Show’s Frank Pinello to taste test internet-famous pizzas like The Taco Taco Taco Pizza, The Pizza Box Pizza, and a 24 Karat Gold Pizza that costs $2,000 per pie.

Meet Unko Sensei, the poop teacher making kanji fun for Japanese kids [Boing Boing]

Unko Sensei (literally Poop Teacher), is a charming mustachioed turd helping Japanese grade-schoolers learn over 1000 kanji characters required by the end of 6th grade. (more…)

The world’s heaviest weight [Boing Boing]

The YouTube channel Veritasium visits the world’s heaviest weight at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Washington, D.C. With a maximum force of 1 million pounds, it's used to measure the force of planes, jets, and rockets.

World’s first orbital-class rocket launches from a private launch site [Ars Technica]

Rocket Lab

On Thursday, shortly after midnight on the US East Coast, a New Zealand-based rocket company launched an orbital-class rocket from a private launch site for the first time. While relatively small, Rocket Lab's Electron launch vehicle stands at the vanguard of a new class of launchers designed to place increasingly tiny satellites into space. Among competitors such as Virgin Orbit and Vector Space Systems, which are late in the development stage, it is the first small satellite launch company to put a full-size rocket into space.

“We’re one of a few companies to ever develop a rocket from scratch and we did it in under four years," said Peter Beck, chief executive and founder of Rocket Lab. "We’ve worked tirelessly to get to this point. We’ve developed everything in house, built the world’s first private orbital launch range, and we’ve done it with a small team."

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Jinbei Studio Flash Units Recalled for Electrocution Risk [Strobist]

The Swiss government last month issued a recall for ten models of Jinbei studio flash units. While the recall notice has made the rounds on message boards, I am frankly surprised that photo media outlets have not picked this up. Read more »

Report On U.S. Airstrike That Killed Civilians In Mosul To Be Released Thursday [News : NPR]

Iraqis inspect the damage in Mosul

The Pentagon reportedly believes a building where scores of civilians died after a U.S. airstrike in Mosul was either used to store bombs or rigged with explosives.

(Image credit: Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

A Proposed New Tax, Mainly On Latinos, To Pay For Trump's Border Wall [News : NPR]

It's called "The Border Wall Funding Act of 2017." And it would place a new tax on money being wired to Latin America and the Caribbean.

Google’s blob emoji are great and no one will convince me otherwise [The Verge - All Posts]

A ton of things happened at Google I/O, but somehow the biggest news from last week was never even mentioned on stage: the latest version of Android will kill the blob-style emoji and replace them with circular ones that are more consistent with those from iOS, Twitter, Facebook, Samsung, and more.

Many people, including some of us here at The Verge, said this was long overdue. But I say nay! To me, this is A Very Bad Move.

As I briefly said in last week’s episode of The Vergecast, I adore the blob emoji because they’re cute, unique, and show a lot of personality and expressiveness. While we can argue about the cons of Android fragmentation, one of the many reasons I like Android is because you actually have so many options to show...

Continue reading…

HTC’s new Link VR headset pairs with its U11 smartphone [The Verge - All Posts]

HTC is unveiling a new VR headset today, designed to work with the company’s latest U11 smartphone. The new HTC Link includes six degrees-of-freedom tracking, a first for a smartphone-based VR headset, and appears to use an external camera sensor to track its motion controllers with lights (much like Sony’s PlayStation VR). UploadVR reports that both the camera and controllers are bundled in the box, but that the HTC Link will only be available in Japan.

While the Link is designed for the U11, the VR headset includes two 3.6-inch 1080 x 1200 LCD displays with a 110 degree field of view and support for 90Hz refresh rate. That means the U11’s display won’t be housed within the Link headset itself, and both devices connect via a USB-C...

Continue reading…

Rocket Lab launched its experimental rocket to space for the first time — but didn’t reach orbit [The Verge - All Posts]

Aerospace startup Rocket Lab launched its experimental Electron rocket for the first time from New Zealand today — marking the first of three test flights the company hopes to do this year before the vehicle begins commercial launches. While the rocket successfully made it to space three minutes after take off, it “didn’t quite reach orbit” as planned, according to Rocket Lab’s CEO, Peter Beck. The company will be investigating why and will aim for the Electron to get to orbit during its second test flight.

“Reaching space in our first test puts us in an incredibly strong position to accelerate the commercial phase of our program, deliver our customers to orbit, and make space open for business,” Beck said in a statement.

Continue reading…

07:00 EDT

8 In 10 People Now See Climate Change As a 'Catastrophic Risk,' Says Survey [Slashdot]

An anonymous reader quotes a report from the Thomas Reuters Foundation: Nearly nine in 10 people say they are ready to make changes to their standard of living if it would prevent future climate catastrophe, a survey on global threats found Wednesday. The survey of more than 8,000 people in eight countries -- the United States, China, India, Britain, Australia, Brazil, South Africa and Germany -- found that 84 percent of people now consider climate change a "global catastrophic risk." That puts worry about climate change only slightly behind fears about large-scale environmental damage and the threat of politically motivated violence escalating into war, according to the Global Challenges Foundation, which commissioned the Global Catastrophic Risks 2017 report. The survey, released in advance of this week's G7 summit of advanced economies in Italy, also found that 85 percent of people think the United Nations needs reforms to be better equipped to address global threats. About 70 percent of those surveyed said they think it may be time to create a new global organization -- with power to enforce its decisions -- specifically designed to deal with a wide range of global risks. Nearly 60 percent said they would be prepared to have their country give up some level of sovereignty to make that happen.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

06:00 EDT

Remember the Milk [Cool Tools]

I have been using the task manager, Remember the Milk, since 2009 — the somewhat early days of web 2.0 “free” to-do apps. The free version sufficed for a few years, but when I started using a smartphone, it wasn’t long before I decided to upgrade to enable continuous syncing between the browser and iPhone apps.

I’ve tested Todoist, Do, Wunderlist, and probably others, but have always come back to Remember the Milk (RTM) for a number of reasons:

  1. I don’t have to use the mouse; within the app, browsing, searching, and adding complex tasks can be accomplished using the built-in key commands and smart-add language.
  2. It integrates with Quicksilver for Mac, allowing me to quickly add tasks without leaving whatever app I’m in, and if I’m not at my laptop I can email new tasks to the app (I set up an IFTT button on my phone which accomplishes this even faster than opening the RTM mobile app).
  3. I can subscribe to my task feed in Google Calendar — anything dated now appears in my calendar.
  4. Any search, from simple to advanced, can be saved as a smart list. My own “Today” smart list functions as I want it to, which is slightly different than the app’s built-in Today list: it shows tasks that might be overdue by only a day, tasks due tomorrow, and un-dated tasks marked with high priority.

Now the app does much more than keep my tasks organized; I file everything that isn’t an actual file here: links to articles to read, gift ideas, birthdays, web bookmarks, line items to add to my cv, project ideas, packing lists (which can be archived when not in use), etc. The one piece of missing functionality now feels entirely intentional: you can’t save attachments. For some this would be a deal-breaker, but I appreciate the separation of thoughts and digital clutter. This is task-making and note-taking (in plain text!) only, and it does both of these jobs exceedingly well. Now I don’t have to remember where I saved anything — anything worth recalling later I add here.

-- Claire Iltis

Remember the Milk

Free and paid ($40/yr) versions

What It's Like To Live In A Small, Rural, Politically Divided Town [News : NPR]

Local Haines politics has gotten pretty intense lately — a group of Haines residents is trying to recall half of the borough assembly.

Politics in Haines, Alaska — population 2,500 — has grown intensely bitter lately, reflecting the volume and heat of national politics.

(Image credit: Elissa Nadworny/NPR)

At 43, Goodwill Helped Her Get A High School Diploma [News : NPR]

The Goodwill Excel Center in Austin, TX.

Most American adults have finished high school. For those who haven't, wages are rock bottom and the unemployment rate is more than 7 percent. That's why Goodwill opened a charter school for adults.

(Image credit: Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT)

Should The Police Control Their Own Body Camera Footage? [News : NPR]

A Newark police officer wears a body camera last month. The cameras, which will be worn by officers as part of a federal monitoring agreement, are provided by Panasonic.

There is a growing perception that body cameras, now generating millions of hours of footage, are there less to keep tabs on police, and more to keep tabs on the public.

(Image credit: Julio Cortez/AP)

Trump Said He Would Donate Foreign-Government Profits; Docs Suggest Limited Effort [News : NPR]

President Trump pledged that the Trump Organization would donate profits from foreign governments, but the top Democrat in the House Oversight Committee says the organization does not appear to be following through.

The Trump Organization told staff that asking guests if they represent a foreign government would impede privacy. The House Oversight Committee's top Democrat says the policy raises "grave concerns."

(Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

New Immigration Crackdowns Creating 'Chilling Effect' On Crime Reporting [News : NPR]

Officer Jesus Robles (at right) and Officer Jason Cisneroz, community service officers in the Houston Police Department, have noticed that fewer unauthorized Latinos step forward to report crimes out of fear of deportation.

Police caution President Trump's immigration dragnet will isolate immigrants who are in the country illegally and are victims of crimes. In Houston, some report that it's already happening.

(Image credit: John Burnett/NPR)

05:00 EDT

Liverpool, I'll see you tonight on the Walkaway tour! (then Birmingham, Hay-on-Wye, San Francisco...) (!) [Boing Boing]

Thanks to everyone who came out for last night's final London event on the UK Walkaway tour, at Pages of Hackney with Olivia Sudjic; today I'm heading to Waterstones Liverpool One for an event with Dr Chris Pak, followed by a stop tomorrow at Waterstones in Birmingham and then wrapping up in the UK with an event with Adam Rutherford at the Hay Festival. (more…)

Remembering the original, Harold Pinter screen adaptation of The Handmaid's Tale [Boing Boing]

Zachary Smith writes, "Almost 30 years before Hulu's take on Margaret Atwood's feminist classic, a less-successful adaptation was filmed in Durham, NC. Here's a well-researched look at the making of that film, and its strange parallels to the community." (more…)

Colombian biologist won't go to jail for 8 years for sharing a scientific paper (probably) [Boing Boing]

Timothy writes, "Diego Gómez is a Colombian conservation biologist. When he was a college student, he shared a single research paper online so that others could read and learn from it, just as he did. Diego was criminally prosecuted for copyright infringement, and faced up to 8 years in prison." (more…)

Would-be Montana GOP Congressjerk with ties to sanctioned Russian companies beats up reporter at press-conference [Boing Boing]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQwu4wff7lI

Greg Gianforte is a short-tempered, hyper-conservative Montana political hopeful who is standing for the GOP in a special election for a Congressional seat; he is also invested in Russian firms that are under US sanction. (more…)

04:00 EDT

Boeing Will Make the Military's New Hypersonic Spaceplane [Slashdot]

The Department of Defense has selected Boeing to make a new hypersonic spaceplane that can be reused frequently over a short period of time to deliver multiple satellites into orbit. "DARPA, the agency that tests new advanced technologies for the military, has picked Boeing's design concept, called the Phantom Express, to move forward as part of the agency's Experimental Spaceplane (XS-1) program," reports The Verge. From the report: The goal of DARPA's XS-1 program is to create a spacecraft that's something of a hybrid between an airplane and a traditional vertical rocket. The spaceplane is meant to take off vertically and fly uncrewed to high altitudes above Earth. From there, the vehicle will release a mini-rocket -- a booster with an engine that can propel a satellite weighing up to 3,000 pounds into orbit. As the booster deploys the satellite, the spaceplane will then land back on Earth horizontally just like a normal airplane -- and then be fueled up for its next mission. DARPA wants the turnaround time between flights to last just a few hours. But perhaps the most audacious goal is the price DARPA wants for each flight. The agency is aiming for the spaceplane to cost $5 million per mission, a significant bargain considering most orbital rockets cost tens to hundreds of millions of dollars to launch. And Boeing says it's up to the task. "Phantom Express is designed to disrupt and transform the satellite launch process as we know it today, creating a new, on-demand space-launch capability that can be achieved more affordably and with less risk," Darryl Davis, president of Boeing Phantom Works, said in a statement.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Girl Dragged Into Water By Sea Lion Treated For 'Seal Finger' Infection [News : NPR]

A video went viral earlier this week showing a sea lion grabbing a Canadian girl

The Canadian girl received a superficial wound and is being treated for a possible bacterial infection. Marine life experts warned she could be at risk for a rare infection known as seal finger.

(Image credit: Screenshot by NPR)

02:00 EDT

UK Tories say they'll exploit Manchester's dead to ban working crypto in the UK [Boing Boing]

One of UK Prime Minister Theresa May's government ministers told a reporter from The Sun that the government is planning on invoking the "Technical Capabilities Orders" section of the Snoopers Charter, a 2016 domestic spying bill; the "orders" allow the government to demand that companies cease using working cryptography in their products and services, substituting it with deliberately defective code that can be broken. (more…)

AlphaGo beats Ke Jie again to wrap up three-part match [The Verge - All Posts]

AlphaGo has again defeated Ke Jie, the world’s number one Go player, in their second game, meaning the AI has secured victory in the three-part match. The win over Ke, universally considered the best Go player in the world, essentially confirms that AlphaGo has surpassed human Go ability a little over a year after the AI first beat Lee Se-dol.

Ke played “perfectly” for about the first 50 moves, according to AlphaGo’s analysis, and evolved his strategy to engage in a series of complex battles across the board. But AlphaGo handled the multi-angled assault well to simplify the engrossing game and eventually forced Ke to resign. “For the first 100 moves it was the closest we’ve ever seen anyone play against the Master version of AlphaGo,”...

Continue reading…

00:00 EDT

Manchester Attack Could Lead To Internet Crackdown [Slashdot]

New submitter boundary writes: The UK government looks to be about to put the most egregious parts of the Investigative Powers Act into force "soon after the election" (which is in a couple of weeks) in the wake of the recent bombing in Manchester. "Technical Capability Orders" require tech companies to break their own security. I wonder who'll comply? The Independent reports: "Government will ask parliament to allow the use of those powers if Theresa May is re-elected, senior ministers told The Sun. 'We will do this as soon as we can after the election, as long as we get back in,' The Sun said it was told by a government minister. 'The level of threat clearly proves there is no more time to waste now. The social media companies have been laughing in our faces for too long.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Gogoro’s colorful new electric scooter is twice as cheap but just as fast as before [The Verge - All Posts]

Taiwanese company Gogoro is rolling out an all-new electric scooter called the Gogoro 2 Smartscooter. But instead of the futuristic look that turned so many heads when the company came out of stealth at CES 2015, Gogoro is trying to put a modern spin on the classic scooter look with the Gogoro 2.

The company will start selling the new scooter this summer in Taiwan, and it says it will be available “in other markets by the end of 2017.” (Though it wouldn’t say whether that means it will sell the Gogoro 2 in other markets or if that means the scooter will be added to the company’s scooter sharing fleets in Berlin and Paris.) It will cost NT$38,800 ($1,295 USD) and comes in six colors — white, grey, orange, blue, yellow, and red.

Continue reading…

Wednesday, 24 May

22:00 EDT

Vermont DMV Caught Using Illegal Facial Recognition Program [Slashdot]

schwit1 quotes a report from Vocativ: The Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles has been caught using facial recognition software -- despite a state law preventing it. Documents obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union of Vermont describe such a program, which uses software to compare the DMV's database of names and driver's license photos with information with state and federal law enforcement. Vermont state law, however, specifically states that "The Department of Motor Vehicles shall not implement any procedures or processes that involve the use of biometric identifiers." The program, the ACLU says, invites state and federal agencies to submit photographs of persons of interest to the Vermont DMV, which it compares against its database of some 2.6 million Vermonters and shares potential matches. Since 2012, the agency has run at least 126 such searches on behalf of local police, the State Department, FBI, and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

On Eve Of Election, Montana GOP Candidate Charged With Assault On Reporter [News : NPR]

Republican Greg Gianforte (right) welcomes Donald Trump Jr., the president

Greg Gianforte's campaign spokesman claimed The Guardian's Ben Jacobs was the aggressor and knocked both men down, but an audio recording and witnesses suggested otherwise, and authorities cited him.

(Image credit: Bobby Caina Calvan/AP)

Feeds

FeedRSSLast fetchedNext fetched after
XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
… My heart’s in Accra XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Aaron Shaw's weblog XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
academic coach XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Andrew Lih XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Ars Technica XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Black Girl Dangerous XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
Blog – Cal Newport XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Blog – Cal Newport XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
Boing Boing XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:30, Thursday, 25 May
Camels With Hammers XML 03:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Cool Tools XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
copyrighteous XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Cyborgology XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
Derek Sivers XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
Digital History Hacks (2005-08) XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Dullicious.net XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
eon XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Future of the Internet – And how to stop it. XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Geek Feminism Blog XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
Geek&Poke XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 20:00, Thursday, 25 May
goatee XML 03:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Greg Goodale XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Hacker News XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Interprete XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Jimmy Wales XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Joho the Blog XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Joi Ito's Web XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Latest Articles XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
LESSIG Blog, v2 XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 20:00, Thursday, 25 May
Lifehacker XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Mel Chua XML 03:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
MichaelZimmer.org XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Ming Thein | Photographer XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 20:00, Thursday, 25 May
miromi XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
Mr. Money Mustache XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
natematias's blog XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
NeuroLogica Blog XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
News : NPR XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Nikki XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
OkTrends XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
ongoing by Tim Bray XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
Open Wiki Blog Planet XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
patdavid.net XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 20:00, Thursday, 25 May
Paul Resnick's Occasional Musings XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Pharyngula XML 03:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Philip Greenspun's Weblog XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
PressThink XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Priceonomics Blog XML 03:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Professional-Lurker: Comments by an academic in cyberspace XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
ProfHackerProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
quarlo XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 20:00, Thursday, 25 May
ragesoss XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Slashdot XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:30, Thursday, 25 May
Strobist XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:12, Thursday, 25 May
Sublime Blog XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 20:00, Thursday, 25 May
The age of us – The Conversation XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
The Verge - All Posts XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
This Sociological Life XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
tinywords XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
Tynan | Life Outside the Box XML 02:00, Thursday, 25 May 10:00, Thursday, 25 May
Valerie Aurora's blog XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
W3C News XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Wikipedia Signpost XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Wikizine XML 07:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May
Women4Wikipedia XML 04:00, Thursday, 25 May 08:00, Thursday, 25 May
Wooster Collective XML 08:00, Thursday, 25 May 09:00, Thursday, 25 May