1. Help with teleonomy

    While grading papers I noticed that a student referred to the Wikipedia definition of teleonomy, a concept I have discussed in class, with a quotation that I found contrary to my own understanding: "teleonomic process, such as evolution..." I thought, "whoa!", evolution is not teleonomic and the version of the …

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  2. Brandt and Wikipedia plagiarism

    Since I am a student of plagiarism in reference work production, I read with interest Daniel Brandt's (2006) analysis of Plagiarism by Wikipedia editors. He claims that he found 145 instances of Wikipedia plagiarizing others (roughly 1% of his sample), and projects that the "plagiarism rate on Wikipedia is at …

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  3. The elusive Jimmy Wales

    Like others, I have been surprised that the Wikipedia policies of No Original Research (WP:NOR, Wikipedia 2006nor) and Verifiability (WP:V, Wikipedia 2006v) had been collapsed into a new policy of Attribution (WP:ATT, Wikipedia 2007a). The two former policies, in addition to Neutral Point of View (WP:NPOV …

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  4. Good faith, bad faith

    Despite appearances, I do make note of the Wikipedia disaffected. A possible criticism of my work is my focus on the notion of "good faith" in collaboration misses this constituency. No doubt one could write many volumes on the conflict and "dissensus" of Wikipedia. (Deetz (1996) considers the consensus/dissensus …

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  5. History, Wikinomics, and Causation

    An issue related to the question of priority, noted in a previous entry, is the general historical question of causality. Priority, who first had an idea or published it, can be a trivial question relative to a claim about who or what caused something. Niels Bohr modeled the atom, but …

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  6. Auctorial Leadership?

    A few days ago, while walking home from the local library, I recalled an expression I learned in a class on early Christian history: primus inter pares. This notion was used by early church leaders (e.g., the Bishop of Rome, now the Pope) and present day patriarchs to indicate …

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  7. Wikis as Communities of Practice

    When I've spoken about the advantages of Wikis in the past, I pointed out the benefit of having organizational/cultural knowledge documentation be very "close" with actual practice. Programmers are familiar with this issue in the form of their code being synchronized (or more likely not) with its documentation. An …

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