1. Bugs and Discourse

    Since beginning my work at NYU the majority of my focus, obviously, has been on Wikipedia. However, some research I began almost 4 years ago has finally been published as: Joseph Reagle. Bug tracking systems as Public Spheres. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology, 11(1), 2007. URL http://scholar …

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  2. Lessig and emergent corruption

    It is with interest that I’ve noted Lawrence Lessig’s announcement a career shift away from his work on restoring sanity to the copyright regime. I too once grew frustrated and fatigued with the policy process around copyrights, patents, and privacy because of that which Lessig now calls “corruption …

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  3. Dunc-Tank and Money

    Like Biellla, I have been following from afar the controversy [1,2] associated with the dunc-tank project: a way for a few Debian developers to accept donations. The moderate amount of money (appreciated nonetheless I’m sure) caused an extraordinary ruckus among other volunteers, leading to protest and resignations.

    How …

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  4. Why Culture is Important

    During a conference on Friday, panelists from popular social network sites were asked to speculate about the future. Scott Heiferman, co-founder of Meetup, presented a vision of technological advance and social progress along familiar lines: technology, information, democracy, etc. For example, we might not have to worry about privacy and …

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  5. Epistemic stances

    When it comes to making claims, about reality or anything else really, a number of different stances might be adopted by the speaker:

    • Objectivity: the claims have a correspondence to reality; they are typically embedded in a framework by which their validity is affirmed. For example, the scientific method posits …
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  6. Lost Minorities

    In a discussion on the possibility of limiting anonymous edits to the Wikipedia – resulting from the mad dash of unwelcome activity during April Fool’s day – a participant replied “This one comes up again and again, and the consensus has always been ‘nope, anon edits will continue thanks.’” I am …

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  7. Early cooperative norms

    Just ten years after the first electronic computer was built, and two years after the release of IBM’s first mainframe, a collaborative association was formed by which IBM customers could collaborate, called Share. The following is reminiscent of the many the Wikipedia dictates on keeping a humble and open …

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