1. Digital Posterity

    I have over 1000 primary sources in my Wikipedia research mindmaps. In accumulating some of those sources, I have already been confronted with their ephemerality. (And these are public sources only; I know lots of e-mails I would've liked to have access to by the likes of Wales, Sanger, and …

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  2. Too magnificent

    I recently read Andrew Ross' "No Collar: The Humane Workplace and Its Hidden Costs: Behind the Myth of the New Office Utopia" in remembrance of my own brief time as consultant in New York's "Silicon Alley" during the booming 90s. I even had a few meetings at Ross' study site …

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  3. Reuse vs. self plagiarism

    Yesterday's New York Times reported on another case of high profile plagiarism: a relatively young professor who had copied parts of her dissertation from another. Even though she had previously acknowledged as much in private and has now resigned -- so there's no question of ambiguous boundaries -- a few things struck …

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  4. Grey literature, stigmergy and priority

    Last week I read a provocative paper by Helen Nissenbaum (2002) where she considers the norms, values, and ends previously served by the convention of scholarly priority, and, now that the contextual landscape is changing because of electronic media, whether intellectual property (patents) can serve just as well in their …

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  5. Broken lists

    I'm presently cursing whoever changed the configuration/names of Wikipedia lists. Identifying emails in archives is sadly a difficult problem, it really need not be, but fortunately the good folks at the aimsgroup MARC also archive the lists and associate the unique identifier of every message with a persistent and …

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  6. A note on bibliography

    I'm sharing this note from the beginning of my dissertation so others working with online resources might comment.

    The type and number of bibliographic sources of this work merit a couple comments.

    First, most of the primary sources are online, and have only been online. Quotations from e-mail and most …

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  7. Outsider Contributions

    When I make a substantive contribution to Wikipedia, I tend to edit "off-line" until I'm satisfied with the text, and then post it in a single chunk. While I am only a WikiGnome in any case, the typical Wikipedia metric of "edit counts" would underestimate the contribution made by people …

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  8. The method of haiku

    A Zen-inspired aesthetic of haiku is sabi: an insightful appreciation of the "suchness" of ordinary objects and daily events. Hass (1994:xiv) writes of this as a "quality of actuality, of the moment seized on and rendered purely." This pureness of vision led Barthes (1983:60) to claim that haiku's …

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