1. Good faith, bad faith

    Despite appearances, I do make note of the Wikipedia disaffected. A possible criticism of my work is my focus on the notion of "good faith" in collaboration misses this constituency. No doubt one could write many volumes on the conflict and "dissensus" of Wikipedia. (Deetz (1996) considers the consensus/dissensus …

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  2. History, Wikinomics, and Causation

    An issue related to the question of priority, noted in a previous entry, is the general historical question of causality. Priority, who first had an idea or published it, can be a trivial question relative to a claim about who or what caused something. Niels Bohr modeled the atom, but …

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  3. Auctorial Leadership?

    A few days ago, while walking home from the local library, I recalled an expression I learned in a class on early Christian history: primus inter pares. This notion was used by early church leaders (e.g., the Bishop of Rome, now the Pope) and present day patriarchs to indicate …

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  4. Dunc-Tank and Money

    Like Biellla, I have been following from afar the controversy [1,2] associated with the dunc-tank project: a way for a few Debian developers to accept donations. The moderate amount of money (appreciated nonetheless I'm sure) caused an extraordinary ruckus among other volunteers, leading to protest and resignations.

    How is …

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  5. Gendered Spaces

    The announcement of a "WikiChix" list for female only discussion has prompted a huge thread on WikiEN-l. As previously seen in discussion about an administrator only IRC channel or email list, proposals for separate spaces are particular troubling to communities with liberal egalitarian ideals. Formally excluding anyone from the larger …

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  6. Wikis as Communities of Practice

    When I've spoken about the advantages of Wikis in the past, I pointed out the benefit of having organizational/cultural knowledge documentation be very "close" with actual practice. Programmers are familiar with this issue in the form of their code being synchronized (or more likely not) with its documentation. An …

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  7. Civility and Truth

    Doug Morris, recommended Shapin's (1994) A Social History of Truth which I found very interesting in light of my interest with politeness. Shapin makes an ethno-historical argument that "knowledge is a collective good" of moralistic interdependence. Earlier, the free action and virtue of a gentleman garnered trust as there were …

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