1. The elusive Jimmy Wales

    Like others, I have been surprised that the Wikipedia policies of No Original Research (WP:NOR, Wikipedia 2006nor) and Verifiability (WP:V, Wikipedia 2006v) had been collapsed into a new policy of Attribution (WP:ATT, Wikipedia 2007a). The two former policies, in addition to Neutral Point of View (WP:NPOV …

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  2. Reuse vs. self plagiarism

    Yesterday’s New York Times reported on another case of high profile plagiarism: a relatively young professor who had copied parts of her dissertation from another. Even though she had previously acknowledged as much in private and has now resigned – so there’s no question of ambiguous boundaries – a few …

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  3. Good faith, bad faith

    Despite appearances, I do make note of the Wikipedia disaffected. A possible criticism of my work is my focus on the notion of “good faith” in collaboration misses this constituency. No doubt one could write many volumes on the conflict and “dissensus” of Wikipedia. (Deetz (1996) considers the consensus/dissensus …

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  4. History, Wikinomics, and Causation

    An issue related to the question of priority, noted in a previous entry, is the general historical question of causality. Priority, who first had an idea or published it, can be a trivial question relative to a claim about who or what caused something. Niels Bohr modeled the atom, but …

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  5. Grey literature, stigmergy and priority

    Last week I read a provocative paper by Helen Nissenbaum (2002) where she considers the norms, values, and ends previously served by the convention of scholarly priority, and, now that the contextual landscape is changing because of electronic media, whether intellectual property (patents) can serve just as well in their …

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  6. Auctorial Leadership?

    A few days ago, while walking home from the local library, I recalled an expression I learned in a class on early Christian history: primus inter pares. This notion was used by early church leaders (e.g., the Bishop of Rome, now the Pope) and present day patriarchs to indicate …

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