1. Digital Posterity

    I have over 1000 primary sources in my Wikipedia research mindmaps. In accumulating some of those sources, I have already been confronted with their ephemerality. (And these are public sources only; I know lots of e-mails I would’ve liked to have access to by the likes of Wales, Sanger …

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  2. Bugs and Discourse

    Since beginning my work at NYU the majority of my focus, obviously, has been on Wikipedia. However, some research I began almost 4 years ago has finally been published as: Joseph Reagle. Bug tracking systems as Public Spheres. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology, 11(1), 2007. URL http://scholar …

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  3. Too magnificent

    I recently read Andrew Ross’ “No Collar: The Humane Workplace and Its Hidden Costs: Behind the Myth of the New Office Utopia” in remembrance of my own brief time as consultant in New York’s “Silicon Alley” during the booming 90s. I even had a few meetings at Ross’ study …

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  4. Britannica love

    britannica loveIn Harvey Einbinder’s excellent “The Myth of the Britannica” he includes some of the advertisements used to sell Britannica around 1960 including this one: “HOW CAN YOU EXPRESS THE INEXPRESSIBLE LOVE YOU FEEL FOR YOUR CHILD?” The actual copy, contributed to Dr. D. Alan Walter is not by an …

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  5. The elites and bourgeoisie

    I recently had the opportunity to catch up on some of my reading including new quantitative analysis of Wikipedia contribution. In particular, the question about the inequality of user contribution is a long-standing one (Wales 2005wew2, Voss 2005mw, Swartz 2006www, Ball2007, Kittur et al. 2007, Viegas et al. 2007, and …

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